A World Made New

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780375506925

Category: History

Page: 368

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A World Made New tells the dramatic story of the struggle to build, out of the trauma and wreckage of World War II, a document that would ensure it would never happen again. There was an almost religious intensity to the project, championed by Eleanor Roosevelt under the aegis of the newly formed United nations and brought into being by an extraordinary group of men and women who knew, like the framers of the Declaration of Independence, that they were making history. They worked against the clock, the brief window between the end of World War II and the deep freeze of the cold war, to forget the founding document of the modern rights movement. A distinguished professor of international law, Mary Ann Glendon was given exclusive access to personal diaries and unpublished memoirs of key participants. An outstanding work of narrative history, A World Made New is the first book devoted to this crucial moment in Eleanor Roosevelt's life and in world history.

The Forum and the Tower

How Scholars and Politicians Have Imagined the World, from Plato to Eleanor Roosevelt

Author: Mary Ann Glendon

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199843732

Category: History

Page: 280

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As Mary Ann Glendon writes in this fascinating new book, the relationship between politics and the academy has been fraught with tension and regret-and the occasional brilliant success-since Plato himself. In The Forum and the Tower, Glendon examines thinkers who have collaborated with leaders, from ancient Syracuse to the modern White House, in a series of brisk portraits that explore the meeting of theory and reality. Glendon discusses a roster of great names, from Edmund Burke to Alexis de Tocqueville, Machiavelli to Rousseau, John Locke to Max Weber, down to Charles Malik, who helped Eleanor Roosevelt draft the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. With each, she explores the eternal questions they faced, including: Is politics such a dirty business that I shouldn't get involved? Will I betray my principles by pursuing public office? Can I make a difference, or will my efforts be wasted? Even the most politically successful intellectuals, she notes, did not all end happily. The brilliant Marcus Tullius Cicero, for example, reached the height of power in the late Roman Republic, then fell victim to intrigue, assassinated at Mark Antony's order. Yet others had a lasting impact. The legal scholar Tribonian helped Byzantine Emperor Justinian I craft the Corpus Juris Civilis, which became a bedrock of Western law. Portalis and Napoleon emulated them, creating the civil code that the French emperor regarded as his greatest legacy. Formerly ambassador to the Vatican and an eminent legal scholar, Glendon knows these questions personally. Here she brings experience and expertise to bear in a timely, and timeless, study.

Fundamental Freedoms

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Author: History An Facing History and Ourselves

Publisher: Facing History & Ourselves National Foundation, Incorporated

ISBN: 9780981954325

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 5940

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Eleanor Roosevelt played a pivotal role in creating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in the aftermath of World War II and the Holocaust. Following the death of her husband, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, she participated in the birth of the United Nations and embraced a new role, advocating across the globe for human rights. Using original sources, this resource documents Eleanor's development into a diplomat and renowned human rights leader of the twentieth century, and shows the challenges and determination required to realize the UDHR.

Deutschland und sein Grundgesetz

Themen einer deutsch-amerikanischen Konferenz

Author: Dräger-Stiftung,American Institute for Contemporary German Studies

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Constitutional law

Page: 473

View: 7395

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Das krumme Holz der Humanität

Kapitel der Ideengeschichte

Author: Isaiah Berlin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783827008169

Category: Civilization, Modern

Page: 430

View: 3284

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Mit dem Titel dieses Buches spielt Isaiah Berlin auf ein berühmtes Diktum Immanuel Kants an: "Aus so krummem Holze, als woraus der Mensch gemacht ist, kann nichts ganz Gerades gezimmert werden." Dieser Satz enthält ein Programm, das für die Werke Berlins von Anfang an charakteristisch war: Unabhängigkeit des Denkens und das Plädoyer für Humanität gerade aus dem Wissen um ihre stete Gefährdung. Das krumme Holz der Humanität belegt diese Haltung auf eindrückliche Weise. In acht ideengeschichtlichen Studien diskutiert Isaiah Berlin zentrale Konzepte der Philosophie und Politik, die in den letzten 200 Jahren einen radikalen Bedeutungs- und Bewertungswandel erfahren haben: Pluralismus und Relativismus, Nationalismus und Faschismus, europäische Einheit und Utopie. Berlin beschwört nicht die Kultur Europas, er verkörpert sie - er schreibt und argumentiert aus ihrem Geiste, in genauer Kenntnis ihrer Leistungen und ihrer Widersprüche.

International Human Rights Law

Author: Javaid Rehman

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 9781405811811

Category: Law

Page: 947

View: 3554

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Javaid Rehman emphasises the practical aspects of International Human Rights Law, and introduces the reader to the broad scope of the subject.


Europas muslimische Eliten

Wer sie sind und was sie wollen

Author: Jytte Klausen

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN: 3593402378

Category: Political Science

Page: 306

View: 3926

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Terroristen und Schläfer, Zwangsehen und Ehrenmorde beherrschen die Schlagzeilen – immer wieder ist von Parallelgesellschaften die Rede. Doch die große Mehrheit der in Europa lebenden Muslime hat mit diesem Bild nichts gemein. Ihre führenden Vertreter kommen in diesem Buch zu Wort.

War Crimes and Human Rights

Essays on the Death Penalty, Justice, and Accountability

Author: William Schabas

Publisher: Cameron May

ISBN: 1905017634

Category: Capital punishment

Page: 1158

View: 1261

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This is a collection of essays and articles on human rights law and international criminal law authored by William Schabas, one of the most prominent contemporary scholars and practitioners. Particular attention is given to such topics as the limitation and abolition of the death penalty, genocide and crimes against humanity, the establishment and operation of the International Criminal Court and the ad hoc international criminal tribunals, truth and reconciliation commissions, reservations to human rights treaties, and the implementation of international human rights norms in domestic law

Emerging Areas of Human Rights in the 21st Century

The Role of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Author: Marco Odello,Sofia Cavandoli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136831320

Category: Law

Page: 192

View: 9651

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This book includes a set of studies and reflections that have emerged since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. Encompassing a number of human rights, such as the right to environmental protection, the right to humanitarian aid, and the right to democratic governance, this collection focuses on issues and areas that were not originally mentioned or foreseen in the Declaration but that have since developed into salient topics. These developing rights are considered in the light of contemporary national and international law, as well as against the wider picture and the contexts in which human rights may have effect. Moreover, the topics covered take in a wide range of research fields, including law, politics and criminology. Emerging Areas of Human Rights in the 21st Century is aimed primarily at undergraduate and postgraduate students, and scholars interested in international law, human rights and politics.

A World Beyond Borders

An Introduction to the History of International Organizations

Author: David MacKenzie

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 144269369X

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 8999

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This short and well-written overview provides essential information on the history of international organizations (IOs), with particular focus on the League of Nations, the development of the United Nations, and the UN system. Starting at the beginning of the twentieth century, when there were very few international organizations in existence, A World Beyond Borders traces the growth of IOs through to the close of the century, when there were literally thousands at the heart of the international system. Following this chronological order, the book examines how international organizations became the major legal, moral, and cultural forces that they are today, involved in all aspects of international relations including peacekeeping, disarmament, peace resolution, human rights, diplomacy, and environmentalism. This book is the first in the Canadian Historical Association / University of Toronto Press International Themes and Issues Series, which is dedicated to publishing concise, focused overviews of topics that are of international significance in the study of history.


The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Travaux Préparatoires

Author: William A. Schabas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139619624

Category: Political Science

Page: 2750

View: 6049

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A collection of United Nations documents associated with the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, these volumes facilitate research into the scope of, meaning of and intent behind the instrument's provisions. It permits an examination of the various drafts of what became the thirty articles of the Declaration, including one of the earliest documents – a compilation of human rights provisions from national constitutions, organised thematically. The documents are organised chronologically and thorough thematic indexing facilitates research into the origins of specific rights and norms. It is also annotated in order to provide information relating to names, places, events and concepts that might have been familiar in the late 1940s but are today more obscure.

American Exceptionalism and Human Rights

Author: Michael Ignatieff

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400826889

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 1452

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With the 2003 invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq, the most controversial question in world politics fast became whether the United States stands within the order of international law or outside it. Does America still play by the rules it helped create? American Exceptionalism and Human Rights addresses this question as it applies to U.S. behavior in relation to international human rights. With essays by eleven leading experts in such fields as international relations and international law, it seeks to show and explain how America's approach to human rights differs from that of most other Western nations. In his introduction, Michael Ignatieff identifies three main types of exceptionalism: exemptionalism (supporting treaties as long as Americans are exempt from them); double standards (criticizing "others for not heeding the findings of international human rights bodies, but ignoring what these bodies say of the United States); and legal isolationism (the tendency of American judges to ignore other jurisdictions). The contributors use Ignatieff's essay as a jumping-off point to discuss specific types of exceptionalism--America's approach to capital punishment and to free speech, for example--or to explore the social, cultural, and institutional roots of exceptionalism. These essays--most of which appear in print here for the first time, and all of which have been revised or updated since being presented in a year-long lecture series on American exceptionalism at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government--are by Stanley Hoffmann, Paul Kahn, Harold Koh, Frank Michelman, Andrew Moravcsik, John Ruggie, Frederick Schauer, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Carol Steiker, and Cass Sunstein.

A Vision of Justice

Engaging Catholic Social Teaching on the College Campus

Author: Susan Crawford Sullivan,Ron Pagnucco

Publisher: Liturgical Press

ISBN: 0814682413

Category: Religion

Page: 232

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A Vision of Justice: Engaging Catholic Social Teaching on the College Campus draws together the insights of social scientists, historians, and theologians in order to introduce readers to central topics in Catholic Social Teaching and to provide concrete examples of how it is being put into action by colleges and college students. The authors bring their disciplinary backgrounds and knowledge of Catholic Social Teaching to the exploration of the issues, making the book suitable for use in a wide range of courses and settings. Discussion questions at the end of each chapter help readers to think about issues raised in the essays and to think creatively about Catholic Social Teaching in an ever-changing world. The authors invite readers to join them in engaging contemporary thought and experience in the light of Catholic Social Teaching and the college campus.

Dialogues on Human Rights and Legal Pluralism

Author: René Provost,Colleen Sheppard

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400747101

Category: Law

Page: 290

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Human rights have transformed the way in which we conceive the place of the individual within the community and in relation to the state in a vast array of disciplines, including law, philosophy, politics, sociology, geography. The published output on human rights over the last five decades has been enormous, but has remained tightly bound to a notion of human rights as dialectically linking the individual and the state. Because of human rights’ dogged focus on the state and its actions, they have very seldom attracted the attention of legal pluralists. Indeed, some may have viewed the two as simply incompatible or relating to wholly distinct phenomena. This collection of essays is the first to bring together authors with established track records in the fields of legal pluralism and human rights, to explore the ways in which these concepts can be mutually reinforcing, delegitimizing, or competing. The essays reveal that there is no facile conclusion to reach but that the question opens avenues which are likely to be mined for years to come by those interested in how human rights can affect the behaviour of individuals and institutions.

The Self, Ethics & Human Rights

Author: Joseph Indaimo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317805860

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 5079

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This book explores how the notion of human identity informs the ethical goal of justice in human rights. Within the modern discourse of human rights, the issue of identity has been largely neglected. However, within this discourse lies a conceptualisation of identity that was derived from a particular liberal philosophy about the ‘true nature’ of the isolated, self-determining and rational individual. Rights are thus conceived as something that are owned by each independent self, and that guarantee the exercise of its autonomy. Critically engaging this subject of rights, this book considers how recent shifts in the concept of identity and, more specifically, the critical humanist notion of ‘the other’, provides a basis for re-imagining the foundation of contemporary human rights. Drawing on the work of Jacques Lacan and Emmanuel Levinas, an inter-subjectivity between self and other ‘always already’ marks human identity with an ethical openness. And, this book argues, it is in the shift away from the human self as a ‘sovereign individual’ that human rights have come to reflect a self-identity that is grounded in the potential of an irreducible concern for the other.

Human Rights in the Twentieth Century

Author: Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139494104

Category: History

Page: N.A

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Has there always been an inalienable 'right to have rights' as part of the human condition, as Hannah Arendt famously argued? The contributions to this volume examine how human rights came to define the bounds of universal morality in the course of the political crises and conflicts of the twentieth century. Although human rights are often viewed as a self-evident outcome of this history, the essays collected here make clear that human rights are a relatively recent invention that emerged in contingent and contradictory ways. Focusing on specific instances of their assertion or violation during the past century, this volume analyzes the place of human rights in various arenas of global politics, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented. In doing so, this volume captures the state of the art in a field that historians have only recently begun to explore.