Communities of Journalism

A History of American Newspapers and Their Readers

Author: David Paul Nord

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252026713

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 293

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Newspapers do more than provide information. They enter into the process of forming communities, from voluntary associations to cities to nation-states. Widely acknowledged as one of our most insightful commentators on the history of American journalism, David Paul Nord offers a lively and wide-ranging discussion of journalism as a vital component of community. In settings ranging from the religion-infused towns of colonial America to the rapidly expanding urban metropolises of the late nineteenth century, Nord explores the cultural work of the press. Nord perceives the daily press as an arena in which a broad cross-section of the populace -- ethnically diverse, geographically diffuse, and economically stratified -- could participate in a common culture. During times of crisis, such as the yellow fever epidemic that gripped Philadelphia in 1793, newspapers sustained the bonds of community life. Amassing concrete historical evidence, Nord also examines how ordinary readers make sense of what they read and how they use journalism to form community attachments and engage in civic life. Illuminating how newspapers have intersected with religion, politics, reform, and urban life over nearly three centuries, Communities of Journalism is a deeply satisfying contribution to the cultural history of American journalism and to the history of reading.

The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Gerald J. Baldasty

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN: 9780299134006

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 227

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The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century traces the major transformation of newspapers from a politically based press to a commercially based press in the nineteenth century. Gerald J. Baldasty argues that broad changes in American society, the national economy, and the newspaper industry brought about this dramatic shift. Increasingly in the nineteenth century, news became a commodity valued more for its profitablility than for its role in informing or persuading the public on political issues. Newspapers started out as highly partisan adjuncts of political parties. As advertisers replaced political parties as the chief financial support of the press, they influenced newspapers in directing their content toward consumers, especially women. The results were recipes, fiction, contests, and features on everything from sports to fashion alongside more standard news about politics. Baldasty makes use of nineteenth-century materials—newspapers from throughout the era, manuscript letters from journalists and politicians, journalism and advertising trade publications, government reports—to document the changing role of the press during the period. He identifies three important phases: the partisan newspapers of the Jacksonian era (1825-1835), the transition of the press in the middle of the century, and the influence of commercialization of the news in the last two decades of the century.

Covering America

A Narrative History of a Nation's Journalism

Author: Christopher B. Daly

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 1558499113

Category: History

Page: 533

View: 1930

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A lively history of American journalism from the colonial era to the present day

Out of Print

Newspapers, Journalism and the Business of News in the Digital Age

Author: George Brock

Publisher: Kogan Page Publishers

ISBN: 0749466529

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 5760

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News and journalism are in the midst of upheaval: shifts such as declining print subscriptions and rising website visitor numbers are forcing assumptions and practices to be rethought from first principles. The internet is not simply allowing faster, wider distribution of material: digital technology is demanding transformative change. Out of Print analyzes the role and influence of newspapers in the digital age and explains how current theory and practice have to change to fully exploit developing opportunities. In Out of Print George Brock guides readers through the history, present state and future of journalism, highlighting how and why journalism needs to be rethought on a global scale and remade to meet the demands and opportunities of new conditions. He provides a unique examination of every key issue, from the phone-hacking scandal and Leveson Inquiry to the impact of social media on news and expectations. He presents an incisive, authoritative analysis of the role and influence of journalism in the digital age.

Foundations of Community Journalism

Author: William (Bill) H. Reader,Bill Reader,John A. Hatcher

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412974666

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 283

View: 5901

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Foundations of Community Journalism: A Primer for Research is the first and only book to focus on how to understand and conduct research in this ever increasing field. With chapters written by established journalism academics and teachers, the book provides students and researchers with an understanding of the multiple and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of community journalism, with what community journalism is as a research concept, and with a range of different methods and theories that can be applied to community journalism research. While there are numerous ′how-to′ community journalism manuals for students and newspaper editors, none contains the focus on how to conduct research into community journalism - a focus needed in this era of accountability.

Knightfall

Knight Ridder and How the Erosion of Newspaper Journalism Is Putting Democracy at Risk

Author: Davis Merritt

Publisher: AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn

ISBN: 9780814428672

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 7560

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With corporate balance sheets dictating what we read, freedom of speech is in peril -- and freedom itself may be compromised.

Words at War

The Civil War and American Journalism

Author: David B. Sachsman,S. Kittrell Rushing,Roy Morris

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 9781557534903

Category: History

Page: 412

View: 9933

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Words at War: The Civil War and American Journalism analyzes the various ways in which the nation's newspaper editors, reporters, and war correspondents covered the biggest story of their lives during the Civil War, and in doing so, they reflected and shaped the responses of their readers. The four sections of the book, "Fighting Words," "Confederates and Copperheads," "The Union Forever," and "Continuing Conflict" trace the evolving role of the press in the antebellum, wartime, and postwar periods.

Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights

The Collapse of Journalism and What Can Be Done To Fix It

Author: Robert W. McChesney,Victor Pickard

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595587497

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 913

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The sudden meltdown of the news media has sparked one of the liveliest debates in recent memory, with an outpouring of opinion and analysis crackling across journals, the blogosphere, and academic publications. Yet, until now, we have lacked a comprehensive and accessible introduction to this new and shifting terrain. In Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights, celebrated media analysts Robert W. McChesney and Victor Pickard have assembled thirty-two illuminating pieces on the crisis in journalism, revised and updated for this volume. Featuring some of today’s most incisive and influential commentators, this comprehensive collection contextualizes the predicament faced by the news media industry through a concise history of modern journalism, a hard-hitting analysis of the structural and financial causes of news media’s sudden collapse, and deeply informed proposals for how the vital role of journalism might be rescued from impending disaster. Sure to become the essential guide to the journalism crisis, Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights is both a primer on the news media today and a chronicle of a key historical moment in the transformation of the press.

Partisan Journalism

A History of Media Bias in the United States

Author: Jim A. Kuypers

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442225947

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 306

View: 9219

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In Partisan Journalism: A History of Media Bias in the United States, Jim A. Kuypers guides readers on a journey through American journalistic history, focusing on the warring notions of objectivity and partisanship. Kuypers shows how the American journalistic tradition grew from partisan roots and, with only a brief period of objectivity in between, has returned to those roots today. The book begins with an overview of newspapers during Colonial times, explaining how those papers openly operated in an expressly partisan way; he then moves through the Jacksonian era’s expansion of both the press and its partisan nature. After detailing the role of the press during the War Between the States, Kuypers demonstrates that it was the telegraph, not professional sentiment, that kicked off the movement toward objective news reporting. The conflict between partisanship and professionalization/objectivity continued through the muckraking years and through World War II, with newspapers in the 1950s often being objective in their reporting even as their editorials leaned to the right. This changed rapidly in the 1960s when newspaper editorials shifted from right to left, and progressive advocacy began to slowly erode objective content. Kuypers follows this trend through the early 1980s, and then turns his attention to demonstrating how new communication technologies have changed the very nature of news writing and delivery. In the final chapters covering the Bush and Obama presidencies, he traces the growth of the progressive and partisan nature of the mainstream news, while at the same time explores the rapid rise of alternative news sources, some partisan, some objective, that are challenging the dominance of the mainstream press. This book steps beyond a simple charge-counter-charge of political bias in the news in that it offers an argument that the press in America, except for a brief period, was essentially partisan from its inception and has returned with a vengeance to its original roots. The final argument presented in the book is that this new development may actually be healthy for American Democracy.

A Press Divided

Newspaper Coverage of the Civil War

Author: David B. Sachsman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351534602

Category: History

Page: 356

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A Press Divided provides new insights regarding the sharp political divisions that existed among the newspapers of the Civil War era. These newspapers were divided between North and South, and also divided within the North and South. These divisions reflected and exacerbated the conflicts in political thought that caused the Civil War and the political and ideological battles within the Union and the Confederacy about how to pursue the war. In the North, dissenting voices alarmed the Lincoln administration to such a degree that draconian measures were taken to suppress dissenting newspapers and editors, while in the South, the Confederate government held to its fundamental belief in freedom of speech and was more tolerant of political attacks in the press. This volume consists of eighteen chapters on subjects including newspaper coverage of the rise of Lincoln, press reports on George Armstrong Custer, Confederate women war correspondents, Civil War photojournalists, newspaper coverage of the Emancipation Proclamation, and the suppression of the dissident press. This book tells the story of a divided press before and during the Civil War, discussing the roles played by newspapers in splitting the nation, newspaper coverage of the war, and the responses by the Union and Confederate administrations to press criticism.

Journalism's Roving Eye

A History of American Foreign Reporting

Author: John Maxwell Hamilton

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 080714486X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 680

View: 5485

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In all of journalism, nowhere are the stakes higher than in foreign news-gathering. For media owners, it is the most difficult type of reporting to finance; for editors, the hardest to oversee. Correspondents, roaming large swaths of the planet, must acquire expertise that home-based reporters take for granted -- facility with the local language, for instance, or an understanding of local cultures. Adding further to the challenges, they must put news of the world in context for an audience with little experience and often limited interest in foreign affairs -- a task made all the more daunting because of the consequence to national security. In Journalism's Roving Eye, John Maxwell Hamilton -- a historian and former foreign correspondent -- provides a sweeping and definitive history of American foreign news reporting from its inception to the present day and chronicles the economic and technological advances that have influenced overseas coverage, as well as the cavalcade of colorful personalities who shaped readers' perceptions of the world across two centuries. From the colonial era -- when newspaper printers hustled down to wharfs to collect mail and periodicals from incoming ships -- to the ongoing multimedia press coverage of the Iraq War, Hamilton explores journalism's constant -- and not always successful -- efforts at "dishing the foreign news," as James Gordon Bennett put it in the mid-nineteenth century to describe his approach in the New York Herald. He details the highly partisan coverage of the French Revolution, the early emergence of "special correspondents" and the challenges of organizing their efforts, the profound impact of the non-yellow press in the run-up to the Spanish-American War, the increasingly sophisticated machinery of propaganda and censorship that surfaced during World War I, and the "golden age" of foreign correspondence during the interwar period, when outlets for foreign news swelled and a large number of experienced, independent journalists circled the globe. From the Nazis' intimidation of reporters to the ways in which American popular opinion shaped coverage of Communist revolution and the Vietnam War, Hamilton covers every aspect of delivering foreign news to American doorsteps. Along the way, Hamilton singles out a fascinating cast of characters, among them Victor Lawson, the overlooked proprietor of the Chicago Daily News, who pioneered the concept of a foreign news service geared to American interests; Henry Morton Stanley, one of the first reporters to generate news on his own with his 1871 expedition to East Africa to "find Livingstone"; and Jack Belden, a forgotten brooding figure who exemplified the best in combat reporting. Hamilton details the experiences of correspondents, editors, owners, publishers, and network executives, as well as the political leaders who made the news and the technicians who invented ways to transmit it. Their stories bring the narrative to life in arresting detail and make this an indispensable book for anyone wanting to understand the evolution of foreign news-gathering. Amid the steep drop in the number of correspondents stationed abroad and the recent decline of the newspaper industry, many fear that foreign reporting will soon no longer exist. But as Hamilton shows in this magisterial work, traditional correspondence survives alongside a new type of reporting. Journalism's Roving Eye offers a keen understanding of the vicissitudes in foreign news, an understanding imperative to better seeing what lies ahead.

American Media History

Author: Anthony Fellow

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 111134812X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 496

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AMERICAN MEDIA HISTORY, THIRD EDITION, is a lively, engaging text that focuses on the development of the American media and its impact on society. Each chapter centers on the development of a particular medium. The narrative incorporates brief biographies of important media figures, first-person accounts of experiences with the media, and primary materials to keep students engrossed in the content. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Picturing the Past

Media, History, and Photography

Author: Bonnie Brennen,Hanno Hardt

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252067693

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 3806

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This wide-ranging collection explores the relations between photojournalism and history, investigating how photographs shape both what we remember and how we remember. Contributors discuss dramatic changes in the press's coverage of presidential death from McKinley through Kennedy and examine the selective use of picture postcards in World War I to support the particular image of the war effort that the government wished to cultivate. Other essays examine divergent public reactions to Edward Steichen's Family of Man exhibition and the curious distillation of enormous collections of war photographs -- from the Civil War, the Holocaust, and other cataclysmic events -- into a handful of images that have become cultural icons. Ranging from the rise of photojournalism in the 1930s and its idealization of American life to the issue of authenticity in documentary photography, Picturing the Past provides valuable insight into how photographs influence collective memory, generate a sense of national community, and reinforce prevailing social, cultural, and political values.

Orange Journalism

Voices from Florida Newspapers

Author: Julian M. Pleasants

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813026534

Category: History

Page: 345

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"Orange Journalism delivers the inside scoop on Florida's newspaper business by the people who, through their commitment to this demanding profession, continue to influence the development of the Sunshine State."--Jacket.

The African American Newspaper

Voice of Freedom

Author: Patrick S. Washburn,Medill School of Journalism

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810122901

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 9596

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Winner, 2007 Tankard Award In March of 1827 the nation's first black newspaper appeared in New York City--to counter attacks on blacks by the city's other papers. From this signal event, The African American Newspaper traces the evolution of the black newspaper--and its ultimate decline--for more than 160 years until the end of the twentieth century. The book chronicles the growth of the black press into a powerful and effective national voice for African Americans during the period from 1910 to 1950--a period that proved critical to the formation and gathering strength of the civil rights movement that emerged so forcefully in the following decades. In particular, author Patrick S. Washburn explores how the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender led the way as the two most influential black newspapers in U.S. history, effectively setting the stage for the civil rights movement's successes. Washburn also examines the numerous reasons for the enormous decline of black newspapers in influence and circulation in the decades immediately following World War II. His book documents as never before how the press's singular accomplishments provide a unique record of all areas of black history and a significant and shaping affect on the black experience in America.

News Evolution Or Revolution?

The Future of Print Journalism in the Digital Age

Author: Andrea Miller,Amy Reynolds

Publisher: Peter Lang Gmbh, Internationaler Verlag Der Wissenschaften

ISBN: 9781433123153

Category: Art

Page: 228

View: 4253

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This book tells the story of modern-day newspapers by exploring the digital transition of the New Orleans <I>Times-Picayune as a microcosm of the industry. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and professionals across a range of areas, it explores the economic, political, and social context of the move of the largest daily newspaper (to date) from print to the Web. In doing so it paints a complete picture of the current shape of the newspaper industry. <BR> While the circumstances in New Orleans anchor the book, it also includes exploration of other for-profit and nonprofit business models for newspapers; differences in how communities handle news during a crisis; implications of the digital divide; and, how different communities believe a decline in print journalism impacts politics and the functioning of local government. <BR> By researching in real-time the metamorphosis of the New Orleans <I>Times-Picayune, the book shows what news organizations, journalists, news consumers, and professionals can learn about the future of the global newspaper industry. Is the newspaper industry in the midst of evolution or are its decisions sparking a revolution?

Newspapers and the Making of Modern America

A History

Author: Aurora Wallace

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313323201

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 9657

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Presents a history of newspapers in the United States, categorizing them according to such types as small town publications, city tabloids, chains, community newspapers, and national news organizations.

Race News

Black Journalists and the Fight for Racial Justice in the Twentieth Century

Author: Fred Carroll

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252050096

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 296

View: 705

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Once distinct, the commercial and alternative black press began to crossover with one another in the 1920s. The porous press culture that emerged shifted the political and economic motivations shaping African American journalism. It also sparked disputes over radical politics that altered news coverage of some of the most momentous events in African American history. Starting in the 1920s, Fred Carroll traces how mainstream journalists incorporated coverage of the alternative press's supposedly marginal politics of anti-colonialism, anti-capitalism, and black separatism into their publications. He follows the narrative into the 1950s, when an alternative press re-emerged as commercial publishers curbed progressive journalism in the face of Cold War repression. Yet, as Carroll shows, journalists achieved significant editorial independence, and continued to do so as national newspapers modernized into the 1960s. Alternative writers' politics seeped into commercial papers via journalists who wrote for both presses and through professional friendships that ignored political boundaries. Compelling and incisive, Race News reports the dramatic history of how black press culture evolved in the twentieth century.

That's the Way It Is

A History of Television News in America

Author: Charles L. Ponce de Leon

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022625609X

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 7668

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When critics decry the current state of our public discourse, one reliably easy target is television news. It’s too dumbed-down, they say; it’s no longer news but entertainment, celebrity-obsessed and vapid. The critics may be right. But, as Charles L. Ponce de Leon explains in That’s the Way It Is, TV news has always walked a fine line between hard news and fluff. The familiar story of decline fails to acknowledge real changes in the media and Americans’ news-consuming habits, while also harking back to a golden age that, on closer examination, is revealed to be not so golden after all. Ponce de Leon traces the entire history of televised news, from the household names of the late 1940s and early ’50s, like Eric Sevareid, Edward R. Murrow, and Walter Cronkite, through the rise of cable, the political power of Fox News, and the satirical punch of Colbert and Stewart. He shows us an industry forever in transition, where newsmagazines and celebrity profiles vie with political news and serious investigations. The need for ratings success—and the lighter, human interest stories that can help bring it—Ponce de Leon makes clear, has always sat uneasily alongside a real desire to report hard news. Highlighting the contradictions and paradoxes at the heart of TV news, and telling a story rich in familiar figures and fascinating anecdotes, That’s the Way It Is will be the definitive account of how television has showed us our history as it happens.

The Elements of Journalism

What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect

Author: Bill Kovach,Tom Rosenstiel

Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)

ISBN: 0804136785

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 332

View: 4481

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The authors outline the main principles of journalism, discussing the ethical and professional issues affecting the work of newspeople, the forces shaping the profession, and the future of journalism. 50,000 first printing.