First in Fly

Drosophila Research and Biological Discovery

Author: Stephanie Elizabeth Mohr

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674984730

Category: Science

Page: 270

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A single species of fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been the subject of scientific research for more than one hundred years. Stephanie Elizabeth Mohr explains why this tiny insect merits such intense scrutiny, and how laboratory findings made first in flies have expanded our understanding of human health and disease.

First in Fly

Drosophila Research and Biological Discovery

Author: Stephanie Elizabeth Mohr

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674971019

Category: Science

Page: 270

View: 2082

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A single species of fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been the subject of scientific research for more than one hundred years. Stephanie Elizabeth Mohr explains why this tiny insect merits such intense scrutiny, and how laboratory findings made first in flies have expanded our understanding of human health and disease.

First to Fly

How Wilbur & Orville Wright Invented the Airplane

Author: Peter Busby,David Craig

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781897330524

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 1986

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Looks at the lives of the Wright brothers, from their childhood interest in flight, through their study of successful gliders and other flying machines, to their triumphs at Kitty Hawk and beyond. Reprint.

Lords of the Fly

Drosophila Genetics and the Experimental Life

Author: Robert E. Kohler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226450636

Category: Science

Page: 321

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"One of the most productive of all laboratory animals, Drosophila has been a key tool in genetics research for nearly a century. At the center of Drosophila culture from 1910 to 1940 was the school of Thomas Hunt Morgan and his students Alfred Sturtevant and Calvin Bridges, who, by inbreeding fruit flies, created a model laboratory creature - the 'standard' fly. By examining the material culture and working customs of Morgan's research group, [the author] brings to light essential features of the practice of experimental science. [This book] takes a broad view of experimental work, ranging from how the fly was introducted into the laboratory and how it was physically redesigned for use in genetic mapping, to how the 'Drosophilists' organized an international network for exchanging fly stocks that spread their practices around the world"--Back cover.

First to Fly

The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille, the American Heroes Who Flew for France in World War I

Author: Charles Bracelen Flood

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 080219138X

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 6746

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“The compelling story of the squadron of adventurous young American pilots who were among the first to engage in air combat” (Tampa Bay Times). In First to Fly, lauded historian Charles Bracelen Flood draws on rarely seen primary sources to tell the story of the daredevil Americans of the Lafayette Escadrille, who flew in French planes, wore French uniforms, and showed the world an American brand of heroism before the United States entered the Great War. As citizens of a neutral nation from 1914 to early 1917, Americans were prohibited from serving in a foreign army, but many brave young souls soon made their way into European battle zones. It was partly from the ranks of the French Foreign Legion, and with the sponsorship of an expat American surgeon and a Vanderbilt, that the Lafayette Escadrille was formed in 1916 as the first and only all-American squadron in the French Air Service. Flying rudimentary planes, against one-in-three odds of being killed, these fearless young men gathered reconnaissance and shot down enemy aircraft, participated in the Battle of Verdun and faced off with the Red Baron, dueling across the war-torn skies like modern knights on horseback. “First to Fly shows us that there was something noble and honorable about the Escadrille, men who did not turn against their own country but put their lives up to fight for a cause, not because they had to but because it was the right thing to do.” —The Wall Street Journal

Fly

The Unsung Hero of Twentieth-Century Science

Author: Martin Brookes

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0060936797

Category: Science

Page: 224

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A short biography of a creature that changed science. There's a buzz in the air, the sound of a billion wings vibrating to the tune of scientific success. For generations, the fruit fly has been defining biology's major landmarks. From genetics to development, behavior to aging, and evolution to the origin of the species, it has been a key and, outside academic circles, an unaccredited player in some of the twentieth century's greatest biological discoveries. In fact, everything from gene therapy to cloning and the Human Genome Project is built on the foundation of fruit fly research. This witty, irreverent biography of the fruit fly provides a broad introduction to biology as well as a glimpse into how one short life has informed scientific views on such things as fundamentals of heredity, battle of the sexes, and memory.

Time, Love , Memory

A Great Biologist and His Quest for the Origins of Behavior

Author: Jonathan Weiner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804153361

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 6735

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How much of our fate is decided before we are born? Which of our characteristics is inscribed in our DNA? Weiner brings us into Benzer's Fly Rooms at the California Institute of Technology, where Benzer, and his asssociates are in the process of finding answers, often astonishing ones, to these questions. Part biography, part thrilling scientific detective story, Time, Love, Memory forcefully demonstrates how Benzer's studies are changing our world view--and even our lives. Jonathan Weiner, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Beak of the Finch, brings his brilliant reporting skills to the story of Seymour Benzer, the Brooklyn-born maverick scientist whose study of genetics and experiments with fruit fly genes has helped revolutionize or knowledge of the connections between DNA and behavior both animal and human.

Fly Pushing

The Theory and Practice of Drosophila Genetics

Author: Ralph J. Greenspan

Publisher: CSHL Press

ISBN: 9780879697112

Category: Science

Page: 191

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A new edition of the classic handbook that has become a standard in the Drosophila field. The book is expanded to include topics in which classical genetic strategies have been augmented with new molecular tools. Included are such new techniques as homologous recombination, RNAi, new mapping techniques, and new mosaic marking techniques. Over twenty new illustrations have been added.

Fly Girls

How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviation History

Author: Keith O'Brien

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 1328876721

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 1661

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The untold story of five women who fought to compete against men in the high-stakes national air races of the 1920s and 1930s — and won Between the world wars, no sport was more popular, or more dangerous, than airplane racing. Thousands of fans flocked to multi‐day events, and cities vied with one another to host them. The pilots themselves were hailed as dashing heroes who cheerfully stared death in the face. Well, the men were hailed. Female pilots were more often ridiculed than praised for what the press portrayed as silly efforts to horn in on a manly, and deadly, pursuit. Fly Girls recounts how a cadre of women banded together to break the original glass ceiling: the entrenched prejudice that conspired to keep them out of the sky. O’Brien weaves together the stories of five remarkable women: Florence Klingensmith, a high‐school dropout who worked for a dry cleaner in Fargo, North Dakota; Ruth Elder, an Alabama divorcee; Amelia Earhart, the most famous, but not necessarily the most skilled; Ruth Nichols, who chafed at the constraints of her blue‐blood family’s expectations; and Louise Thaden, the mother of two young kids who got her start selling coal in Wichita. Together, they fought for the chance to race against the men — and in 1936 one of them would triumph in the toughest race of all. Like Hidden Figures and Girls of Atomic City, Fly Girls celebrates a little-known slice of history wherein tenacious, trail-blazing women braved all obstacles to achieve greatness.

How to Fly a Horse

The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery

Author: Kevin Ashton

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 038553860X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 5456

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As a technology pioneer at MIT and as the leader of three successful start-ups, Kevin Ashton experienced firsthand the all-consuming challenge of creating something new. Now, in a tour-de-force narrative twenty years in the making, Ashton leads us on a journey through humanity’s greatest creations to uncover the surprising truth behind who creates and how they do it. From the crystallographer’s laboratory where the secrets of DNA were first revealed by a long forgotten woman, to the electromagnetic chamber where the stealth bomber was born on a twenty-five-cent bet, to the Ohio bicycle shop where the Wright brothers set out to “fly a horse,” Ashton showcases the seemingly unremarkable individuals, gradual steps, multiple failures, and countless ordinary and usually uncredited acts that lead to our most astounding breakthroughs. Creators, he shows, apply in particular ways the everyday, ordinary thinking of which we are all capable, taking thousands of small steps and working in an endless loop of problem and solution. He examines why innovators meet resistance and how they overcome it, why most organizations stifle creative people, and how the most creative organizations work. Drawing on examples from art, science, business, and invention, from Mozart to the Muppets, Archimedes to Apple, Kandinsky to a can of Coke, How to Fly a Horse is a passionate and immensely rewarding exploration of how “new” comes to be.

First Cast

Author: Phil Genova

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 9780811727617

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 320

View: 7838

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Discusses the rewards and value of fly fishing; covers fly tying, tackle, and equipment; and shows how to introduce children to fly fishing techniques

The Fly Trap

Author: Fredrik Sjöberg

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101870168

Category: Nature

Page: 160

View: 5054

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A Nature Book of the Year (The Times (UK)) “The hoverflies are only props. No, not only, but to some extent. Here and there, my story is about something else.” A mesmerizing memoir of extraordinary brilliance by an entomologist, The Fly Trap chronicles Fredrik Sjöberg’s life collecting hoverflies on a remote island in Sweden. Warm and humorous, self-deprecating and contemplative, and a major best seller in its native country, The Fly Trap is a meditation on the unexpected beauty of small things and an exploration of the history of entomology itself. What drives the obsessive curiosity of collectors to catalog their finds? What is the importance of the hoverfly? As confounded by his unusual vocation as anyone, Sjöberg reflects on a range of ideas—the passage of time, art, lost loves—drawing on sources as disparate as D. H. Lawrence and the fascinating and nearly forgotten naturalist René Edmond Malaise. From the wilderness of Kamchatka to the loneliness of the Swedish isle he calls home, Sjöberg revels in the wonder of the natural world and leaves behind a trail of memorable images and stories. From the Hardcover edition.

Lord of the Flies

Author: William Golding

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780399529207

Category: Fiction

Page: 315

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The classical study of human nature which depicts the degeneration of a group of schoolboys marooned on a desert island.

The Feather Thief

Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century

Author: Kirk Wallace Johnson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101981628

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 8356

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“Fascinating from the first page to the last—you won’t be able to put it down.” —Southern Living A rollicking true-crime adventure and a thought-provoking exploration of the human drive to possess natural beauty for readers of The Stranger in the Woods, The Lost City of Z, and The Orchid Thief. On a cool June evening in 2009, after performing a concert at London's Royal Academy of Music, twenty-year-old American flautist Edwin Rist boarded a train for a suburban outpost of the British Museum of Natural History. Home to one of the largest ornithological collections in the world, the Tring museum was full of rare bird specimens whose gorgeous feathers were worth staggering amounts of money to the men who shared Edwin's obsession: the Victorian art of salmon fly-tying. Once inside the museum, the champion fly-tier grabbed hundreds of bird skins—some collected 150 years earlier by a contemporary of Darwin's, Alfred Russel Wallace, who'd risked everything to gather them—and escaped into the darkness. Two years later, Kirk Wallace Johnson was waist high in a river in northern New Mexico when his fly-fishing guide told him about the heist. He was soon consumed by the strange case of the feather thief. What would possess a person to steal dead birds? Had Edwin paid the price for his crime? What became of the missing skins? In his search for answers, Johnson was catapulted into a years-long, worldwide investigation. The gripping story of a bizarre and shocking crime, and one man's relentless pursuit of justice, The Feather Thief is also a fascinating exploration of obsession, and man's destructive instinct to harvest the beauty of nature.

Yesterday We Were in America

Alcock and Brown - First to Fly the Atlantic Non-Stop

Author: Brendan Lynch

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN: 9780857332493

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

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The author sets the background to the flight against the birth of manned powered flight and Britain in the aftermath of the First World War. He goes on to describe the record breaking flight in detail, drawing on Alcock and Brown’s written records and their flying log book, and concludes with a round-up of the fates of all the pioneers who are mentioned in the narrative, and the flight’s legacy for Everyman. Now published as a paperback, Yesterday We Were in America is the first accurate and atmospheric account of one of the most significant and dramatic flights in history.

The Making of a Fly

The Genetics of Animal Design

Author: P. A. Lawrence

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780632030484

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 1985

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Understanding how a multicellular animal develops from a single cell (the fertilized egg) poses one of the greatest challenges in biology today. Development from egg to adult involves the sequential expression of virtually the whole of an organism's genetic instructions both in the mother as she lays down developmental cues in the egg, and in the embryo itself. Most of our present information on the role of genes in development comes from the invertebrate fruit fly, Drosophila. The two authors of this text (amongst the foremost authorities in the world) follow the developmental process from fertilization through the primitive structural development of the body plan of the fly after cleavage into the differentiation of the variety of tissues, organs and body parts that together define the fly. The developmental processes are fully explained throughout the text in the modern language of molecular biology and genetics. This text represents the vital synthesis of the subject that many have been waiting for and it will enable many specific courses in developmental biology and molecular genetics to focus on it. It will appeali to 2nd and 3rd year students in these disciplines as well as in biochemistry, neurobiology and zoology. It will also have widespread appeal among researchers. Authored by one of the foremost authorities in the world. A unique synthesis of the developmental cycle of Drosophila - our major source of information on the role of genes in development. Designed to provide the basis of new courses in developmental biology and molecular genetics at senior undergraduate level. A lucid explanation in the modern language of the science.

Young Orville and Wilbur Wright

First to Fly

Author: Andrew Woods

Publisher: Turtleback

ISBN: 9780606023665

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 867

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A simple biography of the brothers who launched the air age in 1903 when their flying machine stayed in the air for twelve seconds.

Women Who Fly

Goddesses, Witches, Mystics, and other Airborne Females

Author: Serinity Young

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019065970X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 447

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From the beautiful apsaras of Hindu myth to the swan maidens of European fairy tales, tales of flying women--some carried by wings, others by rainbows, floating scarves, or flying horses--reveal both fascination with and ambivalence about female power and sexuality. In Women Who Fly, Serinity Young examines the motif of the flying woman as it appears in a wide variety of cultures and historical periods, expressed in legends, myths, rituals, sacred narratives, and artistic productions. She introduces a wide range of such figures, including supernatural women like the Valkyries of Norse legend, who transport men to immortality; winged deities like the Greek goddesses Iris and Nike; figures of terror like the Furies, witches, and succubi, airborne Christian mystics, and wayward women like Lilith and Morgan le Fay. Looking beyond the supernatural, Young examines the extraordinary mythology surrounding twentieth-century female aviators like Amelia Earhart and Hanna Reitsch. Throughout, the book Young traces the inextricable link between female power and sexuality and the male desire to control it. This is most vividly portrayed in the twelfth-century Niebelungenlied, in which the proud warrior-queen Brünnhilde loses her great physical strength when she is tricked into giving up her virginity. Centuries earlier the theme is seen in Euripides' play Medea, in which the title character--enraged by her husband's intention to marry a younger woman--uses her divine powers in revenge, wreaking chaos and destruction around her. It is a theme that remains tangible even in the twentieth-century exploits of the comic book character Wonder Woman who, Young argues, retains her physical strength only because her love for fellow aviator Steve Trevor goes unrequited. The first book to systematically chronicle the figure of the flying woman in myth, literature, art, and pop culture, Women Who Fly is an exciting, fresh look at the ways in which women have both influenced and been understood by society and religious traditions around the world.

Brave Harriet

The First Woman to Fly the English Channel

Author: Marissa Moss,C. F. Payne

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780152023805

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

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The first American woman to have received a pilot's license, Harriet Quimby, describes her April 1912 solo flight across the English Channel, the first such flight by any woman.

The Girl Who Could Fly

Author: Victoria Forester

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

ISBN: 9781429986366

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 336

View: 1248

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You just can't keep a good girl down . . . unless you use the proper methods. Piper McCloud can fly. Just like that. Easy as pie. Sure, she hasn't mastered reverse propulsion and her turns are kind of sloppy, but she's real good at loop-the-loops. Problem is, the good folk of Lowland County are afraid of Piper. And her ma's at her wit's end. So it seems only fitting that she leave her parents' farm to attend a top-secret, maximum-security school for kids with exceptional abilities. School is great at first with a bunch of new friends whose skills range from super-strength to super-genius. (Plus all the homemade apple pie she can eat!) But Piper is special, even among the special. And there are consequences. Consequences too dire to talk about. Too crazy to consider. And too dangerous to ignore. At turns exhilarating and terrifying, Victoria Forester's debut novel has been praised by Stephenie Meyer, author of the Twilight saga, as "the oddest/sweetest mix of Little House on the Prairie and X-Men...Prepare to have your heart warmed." The Girl Who Could Fly is an unforgettable story of defiance and courage about an irrepressible heroine who can, who will, who must . . . fly. This title has Common Core connections. Praise for Victoria Forester and The Girl Who Could Fly: "It's the oddest/sweetest mix of Little House on the Prairie and X-Men. I was smiling the whole time (except for the part where I cried). I gave it to my mom, and I'm reading it to my kids—it's absolutely multigenerational. Prepare to have your heart warmed." Stephenie Meyer, author of the Twilight saga "In this terrific debut novel, readers meet Piper McCloud, the late-in-life daughter of farmers...The story soars, just like Piper, with enough loop-de-loops to keep kids uncertain about what will come next....Best of all are the book's strong, lightly wrapped messages about friendship and authenticity and the difference between doing well and doing good."--Booklist, Starred Review "Forester's disparate settings (down-home farm and futuristic ice-bunker institute) are unified by the rock-solid point of view and unpretentious diction... any child who has felt different will take strength from Piper's fight to be herself against the tide of family, church, and society."--The Horn Book Review The Girl Who Could Fly is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.