The Roman Law of Slavery

The Condition of the Slave in Private Law from Augustus to Justinian

Author: William Warwick Buckland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Persons (Roman law)

Page: 735

View: 3362

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The Roman Law of Slavery

The Condition of the Slave in Private Law from Augustus to Justinian

Author: William Warwick Buckland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Persons (Roman law)

Page: 735

View: 3398

Release On


The Roman Law of Slavery

The Condition of the Slave in Private Law from Augustus to Justinian

Author: William Warwick Buckland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Persons (Roman law)

Page: 735

View: 8420

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A Text-Book of Roman Law

From Augustus to Justinian

Author: W. W. Buckland,Peter Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521043689

Category: History

Page: 796

View: 9720

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A revised edition of Peter Buckland's classic textbook on Roman Law.


Roman and Civil Law and the Development of Anglo-American Jurisprudence in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Michael H. Hoeflich

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820318394

Category: Law

Page: 207

View: 2350

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Seeking to fill a gap in our knowledge of the legal history of the nineteenth century, this volume studies the influence of Roman and civil law upon the development of common law jurisdictions in the United States and in Great Britain. M. H. Hoeflich examines the writings of a variety of prominent Anglo-American legal theorists to show how Roman and civil law helped common law thinkers develop their own theories. Intellectual leaders in law in the United States and Great Britain used Roman and civil law in different ways at different times. The views of these lawyers were greatly respected even by nonlawyers, and most of them wrote to influence a wider public. By filling in the gaps in the history of jurisprudence, this volume also provides greater understanding of the development of Anglo-American culture and society.

Religion and the Self in Antiquity

Author: David Brakke,Michael L. Satlow,Steven Weitzman

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253217967

Category: Religion

Page: 268

View: 4454

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Many recent studies have argued that the self is a modern invention, a concept developed in the last three centuries. This text challenges that idea by presenting a series of studies that explore the origins, formation, and limits of the self within the religions of the ancient Mediterranean world.

The Roman Law of Slavery the Condition of the Slave in Private Law from Augustus to Justinian

Author: William Warwick Buckland

Publisher: Gale, Making of Modern Law

ISBN: 9781289358235

Category:

Page: 326

View: 2149

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The Making of Modern Law: Foreign, Comparative and International Law, 1600-1926, brings together foreign, comparative, and international titles in a single resource. Its International Law component features works of some of the great legal theorists, including Gentili, Grotius, Selden, Zouche, Pufendorf, Bijnkershoek, Wolff, Vattel, Martens, Mackintosh, Wheaton, among others. The materials in this archive are drawn from three world-class American law libraries: the Yale Law Library, the George Washington University Law Library, and the Columbia Law Library.Now for the first time, these high-quality digital scans of original works are available via print-on-demand, making them readily accessible to libraries, students, independent scholars, and readers of all ages.+++++++++++++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: +++++++++++++++Yale Law LibraryLP3Y100310019080101The Making of Modern Law: Foreign, Comparative, and International Law, 1600-1926Cambridge: At the University Press, 1908xii, [2], 735 p. 25 cmUnited Kingdom

Constantine the Emperor

Author: David Potter

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986029

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 8091

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No Roman emperor had a greater impact on the modern world than did Constantine. The reason is not simply that he converted to Christianity, but that he did so in a way that brought his subjects along after him. Indeed, this major new biography argues that Constantine's conversion is but one feature of a unique administrative style that enabled him to take control of an empire beset by internal rebellions and external threats by Persians and Goths. The vast record of Constantine's administration reveals a government careful in its exercise of power but capable of ruthless, even savage, actions. Constantine executed (or drove to suicide) his father-in-law, two brothers-in-law, his eldest son, and his once beloved wife. An unparalleled general throughout his life, planning a major assault on the Sassanian Empire in Persia even on his deathbed. Alongside the visionary who believed that his success came from the direct intervention of his God resided an aggressive warrior, a sometimes cruel partner, and an immensely shrewd ruler. These characteristics combined together in a long and remarkable career, which restored the Roman Empire to its former glory. Beginning with his first biographer Eusebius, Constantine's image has been subject to distortion. More recent revisions include John Carroll's view of him as the intellectual ancestor of the Holocaust (Constantine's Sword) and Dan Brown's presentation of him as the man who oversaw the reshaping of Christian history (The Da Vinci Code). In Constantine the Emperor, David Potter confronts each of these skewed and partial accounts to provide the most comprehensive, authoritative, and readable account of Constantine's extraordinary life.

Policing the Roman Empire

Soldiers, Administration, and Public Order

Author: Christopher J. Fuhrmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190453788

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 7835

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Historians often regard the police as a modern development, and indeed, many pre-modern societies had no such institution. Most recent scholarship has claimed that Roman society relied on kinship networks or community self-regulation as a means of conflict resolution and social control. This model, according to Christopher Fuhrmann, fails to properly account for the imperial-era evidence, which argues in fact for an expansion of state-sponsored policing activities in the first three centuries of the Common Era. Drawing on a wide variety of source material--from art, archaeology, administrative documents, Egyptian papyri, laws, Jewish and Christian religious texts, and ancient narratives--Policing the Roman Empire provides a comprehensive overview of Roman imperial policing practices with chapters devoted to fugitive slave hunting, the pivotal role of Augustus, the expansion of policing under his successors, and communities lacking soldier-police that were forced to rely on self-help or civilian police. Rather than merely cataloguing references to police, this study sets policing in the broader context of Roman attitudes towards power, public order, and administration. Fuhrmann argues that a broad range of groups understood the potential value of police, from the emperors to the peasantry. Years of different police initiatives coalesced into an uneven patchwork of police institutions that were not always coordinated, effective, or upright. But the end result was a new means by which the Roman state--more ambitious than often supposed--could seek to control the lives of its subjects, as in the imperial persecutions of Christians. The first synoptic analysis of Roman policing in over a hundred years, and the first ever in English, Policing the Roman Empire will be of great interest to scholars and students of classics, history, law, and religion.



Women and the Law in the Roman Empire

A Sourcebook on Marriage, Divorce and Widowhood

Author: Judith Evans Grubbs

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415152402

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 1372

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It is widely recognized that Roman law is an important source of information about women in the Roman world, and can present a more rounded and accurate picture than literary sources. This sourcebook fully exploits the rich legal material of the imperial period - from Augustus (31 BCE - 14 CE) to the end of the western Roman Empire (476 CE), incorporating both pagan and Christian eras, and explaining the rights women held under Roman law, the restrictions to which they were subject, and legal regulations on marriage, divorce and widowhood. The main focus is on the major legal texts (the Digest, the Institutes of Gaius, the Code of Justinian and the Theodosian Code), but a significant number of non-legal documentary sources are included. These are particularly important as they illustrate how the law worked in practice, and how this practice (particularly in the provinces) could differ from the letter of the law. Accessible English translations are enhanced by clear, concise background material, which includes useful explanation of historical and geographical context, and a helpful glossary of Roman legal and administrative terms completes the volume.


Slaves in the New Testament

literary, social, and moral dimensions

Author: James Albert Harrill

Publisher: Fortress Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 8029

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In this exciting new analysis of slaves and slavery in the New Testament, Harrill breaks new ground with his extensive use of Greco-Roman evidence, discussion of hermeneutics, and treatment of the use of the New Testament in antebellum U.S. slavery debates. He examines in detail Philemon, 1 Corinthians, Romans, Luke-Acts, and the household codes.