Sport and the English Middle Classes, 1870-1914

Author: John Lowerson

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719046513

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 9978

Release On

This book examines the phenomena which explain the boom in sport among the middle classes in late Victorian England. The author focuses on the extent to which sport became an agent of the development of the middle classes and an instrument of their self-definition. The book does not set out to explain the making of the English middle classes; rather, it examines a significant part of that making.

Handbook of Sports Studies

Author: Jay Coakley,Eric Dunning

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1446265056

Category: Social Science

Page: 570

View: 9276

Release On

Now available in paperback, this vital handbook marks the development of sports studies as a major new discipline within the social sciences. Edited by the leading sociologist of sport, Eric Dunning, and Jay Coakley, author of the best selling textbook on sport in the USA, it both reflects and richly endorses this new found status. Key aspects of the Handbook include: an inventory of the principal achievements in the field; a guide to the chief conflicts and difficulties in the theory and research process; a rallying point for researchers who are established or new to the field, which sets the agenda for future developments; a resource book for teachers who wish to establish new curricula and develop courses and programmes in the area of sports studies. With an international and inter-disciplinary team of contributors the Handbook of Sports Studies is comprehensive in scope, relevant in content and far-reaching in its discussion of future prospect.

Sport and the Physical Emancipation of English Women (RLE Sports Studies)

1870-1914

Author: Kathleen McCrone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317679644

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 336

View: 745

Release On

The nineteenth century was a golden age in British sports. Not only were sports immensely popular, but they began to assume the forms and qualities that still characterise them today. Moreover, the latter part of the century saw a significant participation in sports by women, and this book provides the first overall examination of this early development and the social changes that it helped to bring about. Since women’s entry into sports was chiefly a consequence of the campaign for better female education, the book begins with an account of sports at the Oxbridge women’s colleges, at the girls' public schools and at the new women’s physical training colleges. It then examines team sports such as hockey, lacrosse, and cricket and individual sports such as tennis, golf and cycling. Other chapters discuss the medical attitudes and prejudices toward women’s participation in sports and the role of sports in changing female dress.


A Companion to Early Twentieth-Century Britain

Author: Chris Wrigley

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470998814

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 7756

Release On

This Companion brings together 32 new essays by leading historians to provide a reassessment of British history in the early twentieth century. The contributors present lucid introductions to the literature and debates on major aspects of the political, social and economic history of Britain between 1900 and 1939. Examines controversial issues over the social impact of the First World War, especially on women Provides substantial coverage of changes in Wales, Scotland and Ireland as well as in England Includes a substantial bibliography, which will be a valuable guide to secondary sources

Serious Sport

J.A. Mangan's Contribution to the History of Sport

Author: Scott Crawford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135756082

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 9276

Release On

Trial-blazer and mentor, Professor J.A. Mangan is a distinguished scholar in the fields of sports history whose work has inspired a generation of historians and social scientists across the globe. His seminal book on athleticism and imperialism commanded attention and applause from a broad range of historians and social scientists across the globe. His seminal work on athleticism and imperialism commanded attention and applause from a broad range of historians. It opened new horizons of inquiry providing the field with a richly perceptive study of hegemony and patronage, of cultural assimilation and adaptation, and of the ways that power elites used sport for socialization, acculturation and social control. His later works continued to pose critical, sometimes controversial questions, providing new and provocative insights into the complex social issues involved in the development and diffusion of sporting activity. The geographical horizons of his work now span the globe. This volume is a fitting tribute to the scholarship and lasting accomplishments of a pioneer who has mentored - and continues to mentor - numerous young scholars internationally, simultaneously developing and maintaining high quality channels through which to disseminate sport history research. In appraising his scholarship the contributors to this collection demonstrate their debt to his vision and achievements. This volume was previously published as a special issue of The International Journal of the History of Sport

The Mechanics of Internationalism

Culture, Society, and Politics from the 1840s to the First World War

Author: Martin H. Geyer,Johannes Paulmann,German Historical Institute in London

Publisher: OUP/German Historical Institute London

ISBN: 9780199202386

Category: History

Page: 471

View: 4132

Release On

This collection of essays traces the origins of modern internationalism and the emergence of global society in the nineteenth century. It offers a fresh approach to the study of international history by looking at the structural prerequisites of the thriving internationalism before the First World War.


Sport, Militarism and the Great War

Martial Manliness and Armageddon

Author: Thierry Terret,J. A. Mangan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135760950

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 329

View: 2213

Release On

The Great War has been largely ignored by historians of sport. However sport was an integral part of cultural conditioning into both physiological and psychological military efficiency in the decades leading up to it. It is time to acknowledge that the Great War also had an influence on sport in post-war European culture. Both are neglected topics. Sport, Militarism and the Great War deals with four significant aspects of the relationship between sport and war before, during and immediately after the 1914-1918 conflict. First, it explores the creation and consolidation of the cult of martial heroism and chivalric self-sacrifice in the pre-war era. Second, it examines the consequences of the mingling of soldiers from various nations on later sport. Third, it considers the role of the Great War in the transformation of the leisure of the masses. Finally, it examines the links between war, sport and male socialisation. The Great War contributed to a redefinition of European masculinity in the post-war period. The part sport played in this redefinition receives attention. Sport, Militarism and the Great War is in two parts: the Continental (Part I) and the "Anglo-Saxon" (Part II). No study has adopted this bilateral approach to date. Thus, in conception and execution, it is original. With its originality of content and the approaching centenary of the advent of the Great War in 2014, it is anticipated that the book will capture a wide audience. This book was originally published as a special issue of The International Journal of the History of Sport.


Leisure and Class in Victorian England

Rational recreation and the contest for control, 1830-1885

Author: Peter Bailey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317973615

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 5664

Release On

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Young People and the Shaping of Public Space in Melbourne, 1870–1914

Author: Simon Sleight

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134789971

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 4726

Release On

Baby booms have a long history. In 1870, colonial Melbourne was ’perspiring juvenile humanity’ with an astonishing 42 per cent of the city’s inhabitants aged 14 and under - a demographic anomaly resulting from the gold rushes of the 1850s. Within this context, Simon Sleight enters the heated debate concerning the future prospects of ’Young Australia’ and the place of the colonial child within the incipient Australian nation. Looking beyond those institutional sites so often assessed by historians of childhood, he ranges across the outdoor city to chart the relationship between a discourse about youth, youthful experience and the shaping of new urban spaces. Play, street work, consumerism, courtship, gang-related activities and public parades are examined using a plethora of historical sources to reveal a hitherto hidden layer of city life. Capturing the voices of young people as well as those of their parents, Sleight alerts us to the ways in which young people shaped the emergent metropolis by appropriating space and attempting to impress upon the city their own desires. Here a dynamic youth culture flourished well before the discovery of the ’teenager’ in the mid-twentieth century; here young people and the city grew up together.


Soccer and Society

South Wales, 1900-1939

Author: Martin Johnes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 2540

Release On

In 1927, Welsh football reached a peak when Cardiff City beat Arsenal in the FA Cup Final. The game's popularity had grown at a notable rate in early 20th-century south Wales and, by 1939, football was an integral part of the region's popular culture.

Rugby and the South African nation

sport, cultures, politics, and power in the old and new South Africas

Author: David R. Black,David Ross Black,John Nauright

Publisher: Manchester Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 163

View: 9771

Release On

Rugby and the South African Nation explores the complex and controversial role of rugby union in the politics and cultures of South Africa, from its emergence as a settler dominion in the early twentieth century through to the post-apartheid era. Conventional historical and political analyses of South Africa have frequently neglected the vital role of sport in general, and rugby in particular, in this fascinating society. This book seeks to fill this gap through a critical interpretation of rugby's role in the development of white society, its virtually ignored role in African communities, its role in shaping significant social divisions and its centrality to the apartheid era "power elite". It also considers the powerful influence of international rugby in forging a racist "national identity" Finally, it examines the varying meanings attached to rugby in the new South Africa from broad euphoria to a more narrow nostalgic appeal for many white rugby supporters with particular emphasis on the 1995 Rugby World Cup hosted and won by South Africa.

Sport, Identity and Ethnicity

Author: Jeremy MacClancy

Publisher: Berg Pub Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 203

View: 3728

Release On

Sport is now a major industry -- and one of increasing importance throughout both the developed and developing world -- but, until now, it has received little serious attention from anthropologists. In this first general book on the anthropology of sport, the contributors look at how different sports are used by a wide variety of peoples to express, manipulate and negotiate their identities, and to challenge the way they are defined by others. Chapters address: -the role played by football teams in colonial Zimbabwe to express locals' autonomy from their British rulers; -the evolution of one of Venice's central festive occasions -- its regatta -- from a ritual of state to a sport of the people; modern and postmodern transformations of polo in Pakistan, its original home -the resolution of problematic aspects of social life in Turkey through wrestling; -the manner by which Catalan nationalists successfully exploited the Barcelona Olympics for their own political ends; and -the controversy between anglers and anti-anglers in Britain. This pioneering volume will be of interest to anthropologists, sociologists, sport historians and all those interested in this popular subject.

Sport, Space and Segregation

Politics and Society in Pietermaritzburg

Author: Christopher Merrett

Publisher: University of Natal Press

ISBN: 9781869141615

Category: History

Page: 391

View: 5862

Release On

This is a story of insiders and outsiders. Author Christopher Merrett uses physical recreation as a lens through which to view the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the South African city of Pietermaritzburg. He traces successive ideologies of imperialism, colonial segregation, and apartheid to show how sport was used to keep communities apart. Sport in Pietermaritzburg was 'white sport.' After the imposition of legislation, access to recreation facilities became a powerful cause for the city's anti-apartheid coalition. Sport provided an opportunity, one of the few in a police state, for meaningful protest. Sport, Space and Segregation provides an insight into the psychology of racism.


Sport in Capitalist Society

A Short History

Author: Tony Collins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135081980

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 2390

Release On

Why are the Olympic Games the driving force behind a clampdown on civil liberties? What makes sport an unwavering ally of nationalism and militarism? Is sport the new opiate of the masses? These and many other questions are answered in this new radical history of sport by leading historian of sport and society, Professor Tony Collins. Tracing the history of modern sport from its origins in the burgeoning capitalist economy of mid-eighteenth century England to the globalised corporate sport of today, the book argues that, far from the purity of sport being ‘corrupted’ by capitalism, modern sport is as much a product of capitalism as the factory, the stock exchange and the unemployment line. Based on original sources, the book explains how sport has been shaped and moulded by the major political and economic events of the past two centuries, such as the French Revolution, the rise of modern nationalism and imperialism, the Russian Revolution, the Cold War and the imposition of the neo-liberal agenda in the last decades of the twentieth century. It highlights the symbiotic relationship between the media and sport, from the simultaneous emergence of print capitalism and modern sport in Georgian England to the rise of Murdoch’s global satellite television empire in the twenty-first century, and for the first time it explores the alternative, revolutionary models of sport in the early twentieth century. Sport in a Capitalist Society is the first sustained attempt to explain the emergence of modern sport around the world as an integral part of the globalisation of capitalism. It is essential reading for anybody with an interest in the history or sociology of sport, or the social and cultural history of the modern world.

Amateurism in British Sport

It Matters Not Who Won or Lost?

Author: Dilwyn Porter,Stephen Wagg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136802908

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 212

View: 1157

Release On

The ideal of the amateur competitor, playing the game for love and, unlike the professional, totally untainted by commerce, has become embedded in many accounts of the development of modern sport. It has proved influential not least because it has underpinned a pervasive impression of professionalism - and all that came with it - as a betrayal of innocence, a fall from sporting grace. In the essays collected here, amateurism, both as ideology and practice, is subject to critical and unsentimental scrutiny, effectively challenging the dominant narrative of more conventional histories of British sport. Most modern sports, even those where professionalism developed rapidly, originated in an era when the gentlemanly amateur predominated, both in politics and society, as well as in the realm of sport. Enforcement of rules and conventions that embodied the amateur-elite ethos effectively limited opportunities for working-class competitors to ‘turn the world upside down’. This book was previously published as a special issue of Sport in History.