Sand County Revisited

Tales from the Leopold Shack

Author: Estella B. Leopold

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190463228

Category:

Page: 336

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Published in 1948, Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac has become an enduring and beloved American classic. More than that, it is rightly seen as one of the foundational texts of the conservation movement. Starting in 1934 and continuing over the course of a dozen or so years, Leopold and his family-including his five children-restored a farm and surrounding lands in south-central Wisconsin. Working together, they put into practice Leopold's "land ethic" involving ecological restoration and sustainability. In the process, they built more than a habitable family shelter or pleasant weekend getaway; they established a new way of relating to nature. In this reflection on the Shack and its inhabitants, Estella B. Leopold, the youngest of Aldo's children, recalls with clear-eyed fondness the part the Shack played in their burgeoning awareness of nature's miracles, season by season. Life at the Shack is recalled vividly and unforgettably: the taste of fresh honey (with honey comb) on sourdough pancakes; the trumpeting arrival of migrating Canada geese; the awesome power of river ice driven by currents. Each improvement to the Shack, whether a new fireplace or a privy, constituted a triumph. As they worked to restore degraded farmland into its original prairie and woods, the Leopolds noted and celebrated all of the flora and fauna that came to share the Shack lands. As first evoked in A Sand County Almanac, and now in Tales from the Leopold Shack, the Leopold family's efforts were among the earliest in ecological restoration in the United States, and their work, collectively and individually, continues to have a profound impact on land management and conservationism. All of Aldo Leopold's children went on to become distinguished scientists and to devote themselves to a life of conservation; their work continues through the Aldo Leopold Foundation. Estella Leopold's intimate and endearing book offers a trip back to the place where it all began.

Engineering Eden

The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight over Controlling Nature

Author: Jordan Fisher Smith

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0307454282

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 6769

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The fascinating story of a trial that opened a window onto the century-long battle to control nature in the national parks. When twenty-five-year-old Harry Walker was killed by a bear in Yellowstone Park in 1972, the civil trial prompted by his death became a proxy for bigger questions about American wilderness management that had been boiling for a century. At immediate issue was whether the Park Service should have done more to keep bears away from humans, but what was revealed as the trial unfolded was just how fruitless our efforts to regulate nature in the parks had always been. The proceedings drew to the witness stand some of the most important figures in twentieth century wilderness management, including the eminent zoologist A. Starker Leopold, who had produced a landmark conservationist document in the 1950s, and all-American twin researchers John and Frank Craighead, who ran groundbreaking bear studies at Yellowstone. Their testimony would help decide whether the government owed the Walker family restitution for Harry's death, but it would also illuminate decades of patchwork efforts to preserve an idea of nature that had never existed in the first place. In this remarkable excavation of American environmental history, nature writer and former park ranger Jordan Fisher Smith uses Harry Walker's story to tell the larger narrative of the futile, sometimes fatal, attempts to remake wilderness in the name of preserving it. Tracing a course from the founding of the national parks through the tangled twentieth-century growth of the conservationist movement, Smith gives the lie to the portrayal of national parks as Edenic wonderlands unspoiled until the arrival of Europeans, and shows how virtually every attempt to manage nature in the parks has only created cascading effects that require even more management. Moving across time and between Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier national parks, Engineering Eden shows how efforts at wilderness management have always been undone by one fundamental problem--that the idea of what is "wild" dissolves as soon as we begin to examine it, leaving us with little framework to say what wilderness should look like and which human interventions are acceptable in trying to preserve it. In the tradition of John McPhee's The Control of Nature and Alan Burdick's Out of Eden, Jordan Fisher Smith has produced a powerful work of popular science and environmental history, grappling with critical issues that we have even now yet to resolve.

Aldo Leopold

His Life and Work

Author: Curt D. Meine

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299249034

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 672

View: 1821

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This biography of Aldo Leopold follows him from his childhood as a precocious naturalist to his profoundly influential role in the development of conservation and modern environmentalism in the United States. This edition includes a new preface by author Curt Meine and an appreciation by acclaimed Kentucky writer and farmer Wendell Berry.

Things Natural, Wild, and Free

The Life of Aldo Leopold

Author: Marybeth Lorbiecki

Publisher: Fulcrum Pub

ISBN: 9781555914745

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 106

View: 7808

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Presents the life of the American conservationist, discussing his early training as a forester, his pioneering work in environmental protection and wildlife management, and his composition of the influential book "A Sand County Almanac."

Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life

Author: David R. Montgomery

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393608336

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 4603

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A MacArthur Fellow’s impassioned call to make agriculture sustainable by ditching the plow, covering the soil, and diversifying crop rotations. The problem of agriculture is as old as civilization. Throughout history, great societies that abused their land withered into poverty or disappeared entirely. Now we risk repeating this ancient story on a global scale due to ongoing soil degradation, a changing climate, and a rising population. But there is reason for hope. David R. Montgomery introduces us to farmers around the world at the heart of a brewing soil health revolution that could bring humanity’s ailing soil back to life remarkably fast. Growing a Revolution draws on visits to farms in the industrialized world and developing world to show that a new combination of farming practices can deliver innovative, cost-effective solutions to problems farmers face today. Cutting through standard debates about conventional and organic farming, Montgomery explores why practices based on the principles of conservation agriculture help restore soil health and fertility. Farmers he visited found it both possible and profitable to stop plowing up the soil and blanketing fields with chemicals. Montgomery finds that the combination of no-till planting, cover crops, and diverse crop rotations provides the essential recipe to rebuild soil organic matter. Farmers using these unconventional practices cultivate beneficial soil life, smother weeds, and suppress pests while relying on far less, if any, fertilizer and pesticides. These practices are good for farmers and the environment. Using less fossil fuel and agrochemicals while maintaining crop yields helps farmers with their bottom line. Regenerative practices also translate into farms that use less water, generate less pollution, lower carbon emissions—and stash an impressive amount of carbon underground. Combining ancient wisdom with modern science, Growing a Revolution lays out a solid case for an inspiring vision where agriculture becomes the solution to environmental problems, helping feed us all, cool the planet, and restore life to the land.

Gardening With Less Water

Low-Tech, Low-Cost Techniques: Use Up to 90% Less Water in Your Garden

Author: David A. Bainbridge

Publisher: Storey Publishing

ISBN: 1612125824

Category: Gardening

Page: 128

View: 1579

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Drawing on traditional practices from around the world, author David A. Bainbridge introduces simple low-tech solutions to today's complex water supply challenges. With detailed photography, he shows how to install buried clay pots and pipes, wicking systems, and other porous containers that deliver water directly to the plant's roots, whether the gardener is tending a bed, container garden, or tree.

Game Management

Author: Aldo Leopold

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299107734

Category: Nature

Page: 520

View: 5744

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With this book, published more than a half-century ago, Aldo Leopold created the discipline of wildlife management. Although A Sand Country Almanac is doubtless Leopold’s most popular book, Game Management may well be his most important. In this book he revolutionized the field of conservation.

A Fierce Green Fire

Aldo Leopold's Life and Legacy

Author: Marybeth Lorbiecki

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019996503X

Category: Conservationists

Page: 400

View: 5559

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Previous editions have title: Aldo Leopold: a fierce green fire.

Walden

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Authors, American

Page: 440

View: 9804

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The Wretched of the Earth

Author: Frantz Fanon

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 9780802198853

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 6950

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Frantz Fanon was one of the twentieth century’s most important theorists of revolution, colonialism, and racial difference, and this, his masterwork, is a classic alongside Orientalism and The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The Wretched of the Earth is a brilliant analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. Bearing singular insight into the rage of colonized peoples and the role of violence in historical change, the book also incisively attacks postindependence disenfranchisement of the masses by the elite on one hand, and intertribal and interfaith animosities on the other. A veritable handbook of social reorganization for leaders of emerging nations, The Wretched of the Earth has had a major impact on civil rights, anticolonialism, and black-consciousness movements around the world. This new translation updates its language for a new generation of readers and its lessons are more vital now than ever.

The River of the Mother of God

and other Essays by Aldo Leopold

Author: Aldo Leopold

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299127633

Category: Nature

Page: 400

View: 5176

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His name is inextricably linked with a single work, A Sand County Almanac, a classic of natural history literature and the conservationist's bible. This book brings together the best of Leopold's essays.

Seeds of Hope

Wisdom and Wonder from the World of Plants

Author: Jane Goodall

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 1455554480

Category: Nature

Page: 432

View: 9787

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In this wise and elegant New York Times bestseller, Jane Goodall examines the critical role that trees and plants play in our world. SEEDS OF HOPE takes us from Goodall's home in England to her home-away-from-home in Africa, deep inside the Gombe forest, where she and the chimpanzees are enchanted by the fig and plum trees they encounter. She introduces us to botanists around the world, as well as places where hope for plants can be found, such as The Millennium Seed Bank. She shows us the secret world of plants with all their mysteries and potential for healing our bodies as well as Planet Earth. Looking at the world as an adventurer, scientist, and devotee of sustainable foods and gardening--and setting forth simple goals we can all take to protect the plants around us--Goodall delivers an enlightening story of the wonders we can find in our own backyards.

For the Health of the Land

Previously Unpublished Essays And Other Writings

Author: Aldo Leopold

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 9781597267984

Category: Nature

Page: 262

View: 4386

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Aldo Leopold's classic work A Sand County Almanac is widely regarded as one of the most influential conservation books of all time. In it, Leopold sets forth an eloquent plea for the development of a "land ethic" -- a belief that humans have a duty to interact with the soils, waters, plants, and animals that collectively comprise "the land" in ways that ensure their well-being and survival.For the Health of the Land, a new collection of rare and previously unpublished essays by Leopold, builds on that vision of ethical land use and develops the concept of "land health" and the practical measures landowners can take to sustain it. The writings are vintage Leopold -- clear, sensible, and provocative, sometimes humorous, often lyrical, and always inspiring. Joining them together are a wisdom and a passion that transcend the time and place of the author's life.The book offers a series of forty short pieces, arranged in seasonal "almanac" form, along with longer essays, arranged chronologically, which show the development of Leopold's approach to managing private lands for conservation ends. The final essay is a never before published work, left in pencil draft at his death, which proposes the concept of land health as an organizing principle for conservation. Also featured is an introduction by noted Leopold scholars J. Baird Callicott and Eric T. Freyfogle that provides a brief biography of Leopold and places the essays in the context of his life and work, and an afterword by conservation biologist Stanley A. Temple that comments on Leopold's ideas from the perspective of modern wildlife management.The book's conservation message and practical ideas are as relevant today as they were when first written over fifty years ago. For the Health of the Land represents a stunning new addition to the literary legacy of Aldo Leopold.

Living a Land Ethic

A History of Cooperative Conservation on the Leopold Memorial Reserve

Author: Stephen A. Laubach

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN: 0299298744

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 136

View: 3669

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"A significant and important story about how a small group of landowners, inspired by Aldo Leopold, pioneered private conservation and ecological restoration. It offers an insightful reflection on what it means to live the 'land ethic' that is quite relevant to today's growing conservation challenges."--Tia Nelson

Literary Publishing in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Wayne Miller,Kevin Prufer,Travis Kurowski

Publisher: Milkweed Editions

ISBN: 1571319220

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 224

View: 6151

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Gutenberg’s invention of movable type in the fifteenth century introduced an era of mass communication that permanently altered the structure of society. While publishing has been buffeted by persistent upheaval and transformation ever since, the current combination of technological developments, market pressures, and changing reading habits has led to an unprecedented paradigm shift in the world of books. Bringing together a wide range of perspectives — industry veterans and provocateurs, writers, editors, and digital mavericks — this invaluable collection reflects on the current situation of literary publishing, and provides a road map for the shifting geography of its future: How do editors and publishers adapt to this rapidly changing world? How are vibrant public communities in the Digital Age created and engaged? How can an industry traditionally dominated by white men become more diverse and inclusive? Mindful of the stakes of the ongoing transformation, Literary Publishing in the 21st Century goes beyond the usual discussion of 'print vs. digital' to uncover the complex, contradictory, and increasingly vibrant personalities that will define the future of the book.

Land and Forest Governance in Swat

Transition from Tribal System to State to Pakistan

Author: Sultan-i-Rome

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199066902

Category: Forest policy

Page: 613

View: 9302

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Rich in factual information, written in a simple style and presented with proper methodology, the book is a detailed study of the land ownership and forest governance issues of the areas that comprised the former Swat State (1915-1969). Based on primary source material, published and unpublished, and covering the period from sixteenth century to 2007, the book is of interest for a wider audience from different fields, strata and walks of life.Dealing with long-standing issues of interest, with solid scholarship, the authors opinions and judgments are professional and non-polemical.

Vanishing British Columbia

Author: Michael Kluckner

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774842539

Category: Art

Page: 224

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The old buildings and historic places of British Columbia form a kind of "roadside memory," a tangible link with stories of settlement, change, and abandonment that reflect the great themes of BC's history. Michael Kluckner began painting his personal map of the province in a watercolour sketchbook. In 1999, after he put a few of the sketches on his website, a network of correspondents emerged that eventually led him to the family letters, photo albums, and memories from a disappearing era of the province. Vanishing British Columbia is a record of these places and the stories they tell, presenting a compelling argument for stewardship of regional history in the face of urbanization and globalization.

Placing the Academy

Essays on Landscape, Work, and Identity

Author: Jennifer Sinor,Rona Kaufman

Publisher: Utah State University Press

ISBN: 9780874216578

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 6218

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A set of creative writers here responds to the call for literature that addresses who we are by understanding where we are—where, for each of them, being somehow part of the academy. Their personal essays delineate the diverse, sometimes unexpected roles of place in shaping them, as writers and teachers in varied environments, through unique experiences and distinctive worldviews—in reconfiguring their conjunctions of identity and setting, here, there, everywhere, and in between. Offering creative comments on place, identity, and academic work are authors Charles Bergman, Mary Clearman Blew, Jayne Brim Box, Jeffrey M. Buchanan, Norma Elia Cantú, Katherine Fischer, Kathryn T. Flannery, Diana Garcia, Janice M. Gould, Seán W. Henne, Rona Kaufman, Deborah A. Miranda, Erin E. Moore, Kathleen Dean Moore, Robert Michael Pyle, Jennifer Sinor, Scott Slovic, Michael Sowder, Lee Torda, Charles Waugh, and Mitsuye Yamada.

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor

Author: Rob Nixon

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674049306

Category: Law

Page: 353

View: 566

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“Slow violence” from climate change, toxic drift, deforestation, oil spills, and the environmental aftermath of war takes place gradually and often invisibly. Rob Nixon focuses on the inattention we have paid to the lethality of many environmental crises, in contrast with the sensational, spectacle-driven messaging that impels public activism today.

Witness Tree

Seasons of Change with a Century-Old Oak

Author: Lynda V. Mapes

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1632862549

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 8213

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An intimate look at one majestic hundred-year-old oak tree through four seasons--and the reality of global climate change it reveals. In the life of this one grand oak, we can see for ourselves the results of one hundred years of rapid environmental change. It's leafing out earlier, and dropping its leaves later as the climate warms. Even the inner workings of individual leaves have changed to accommodate more CO2 in our atmosphere. Climate science can seem dense, remote, and abstract. But through the lens of this one tree, it becomes immediate and intimate. In Witness Tree, environmental reporter Lynda V. Mapes takes us through her year living with one red oak at the Harvard Forest. We learn about carbon cycles and leaf physiology, but also experience the seasons as people have for centuries, watching for each new bud, and listening for each new bird and frog call in spring. We savor the cadence of falling autumn leaves, and glory of snow and starry winter nights. Lynda takes us along as she climbs high into the oak's swaying boughs, and scientists core deep into the oak's heartwood, dig into its roots and probe the teeming life of the soil. She brings us eye-level with garter snakes and newts, and alongside the squirrels and jays devouring the oak's acorns. Season by season she reveals the secrets of trees, how they work, and sustain a vast community of lives, including our own. The oak is a living timeline and witness to climate change. While stark in its implications, Witness Tree is a beautiful and lyrical read, rich in detail, sweeps of weather, history, people, and animals. It is a story rooted in hope, beauty, wonder, and the possibility of renewal in people's connection to nature.