Stuff Matters

Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World

Author: Mark Miodownik

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544236041

Category: History

Page: 252

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A world-leading materials scientist presents an engrossing collection of stories that explain the science and history of materials, from the plastic in our appliances to the elastic in our underpants, revealing the miracles of engineering that seep into our everyday lives. 25,000 first printing.

Stuff Matters

Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World

Author: Mark Miodownik

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544237048

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 5931

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New York Times Bestseller • New York Times Notable Book 2014 • Winner of the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books “A thrilling account of the modern material world.” —Wall Street Journal "Miodownik, a materials scientist, explains the history and science behind things such as paper, glass, chocolate, and concrete with an infectious enthusiasm." —Scientific American Why is glass see-through? What makes elastic stretchy? Why does any material look and behave the way it does? These are the sorts of questions that renowned materials scientist Mark Miodownik constantly asks himself. Miodownik studies objects as ordinary as an envelope and as unexpected as concrete cloth, uncovering the fascinating secrets that hold together our physical world. In Stuff Matters, Miodownik explores the materials he encounters in a typical morning, from the steel in his razor to the foam in his sneakers. Full of enthralling tales of the miracles of engineering that permeate our lives, Stuff Matters will make you see stuff in a whole new way. "Stuff Matters is about hidden wonders, the astonishing properties of materials we think boring, banal, and unworthy of attention...It's possible this science and these stories have been told elsewhere, but like the best chocolatiers, Miodownik gets the blend right." —New York Times Book Review

Stuff Matters

Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World

Author: Mark Miodownik

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780544483941

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 9386

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An eye-opening adventure deep inside the everyday materials that surround us, packed with surprising stories and fascinating science

Liquid

The Delightful and Dangerous Substances That Flow Through Our Lives

Author: Mark Miodownik

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241977312

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 1912

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Sometimes explosive, often delightful, occasionally poisonous, but always fascinating: the secret lives of liquids, from one of our best-known scientists A series of glasses of transparent liquids is in front of you: but which will quench your thirst and which will kill you? And why? Why does one liquid make us drunk, and another power a jumbo jet? From the bestselling author of Stuff Matters comes a fascinating tour of the world of these surprising or sinister substances - the droplets, heartbeats and ocean waves we all encounter every day. Structured around a plane journey which sees encounters with water, wine, oil and more, Miodownik shows that liquids are agents of death and destruction as well as substances of wonder and fascination, and - just as in Stuff Matters - his unique brand of scientific storytelling brings them and their mysterious properties alive in a captivating new way.

Made to Measure

New Materials for the 21st Century

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691009759

Category: Science

Page: 458

View: 4391

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This text describes how scientists are inventing thousands of materials, ranging from synthetic skin, blood and bone, to substances that repair themselves and adapt to their environment. It outlines how newly-invented materials will transform our lives in the 21st century.

Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life

Author: Helen Czerski

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393248976

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 3116

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“[Czerski’s] quest to enhance humanity’s everyday scientific literacy is timely and imperative.”—Science Storm in a Teacup is Helen Czerski’s lively, entertaining, and richly informed introduction to the world of physics. Czerski provides the tools to alter the way we see everything around us by linking ordinary objects and occurrences, like popcorn popping, coffee stains, and fridge magnets, to big ideas like climate change, the energy crisis, or innovative medical testing. She provides answers to vexing questions: How do ducks keep their feet warm when walking on ice? Why does it take so long for ketchup to come out of a bottle? Why does milk, when added to tea, look like billowing storm clouds? In an engaging voice at once warm and witty, Czerski shares her stunning breadth of knowledge to lift the veil of familiarity from the ordinary.

The Science of Everyday Life

Why Teapots Dribble, Toast Burns and Light Bulbs Shine

Author: Marty Jopson

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1782434208

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 3975

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Have you ever wondered why ice floats and water is such a freaky liquid? Or why chillies and mustard are both hot but in different ways? Or why microwaves don't cook from the inside out? In this fascinating scientific tour of household objects, The One Show presenter and all-round Science Bloke Marty Jopson has the answer to all of these, and many more, baffling questions about the chemistry and physics of the everyday stuff we use every day.

The Substance of Civilization

Materials and Human History from the Stone Age to the Age of Silicon

Author: Stephen L. Sass

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1628721731

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 328

View: 8478

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This fascinating book “is a good starting place to develop an appreciation for the history and nature of materials science” (Scientific American). The story of human civilization can be read most deeply in the materials we have found, created, used, and abused. They have dictated how we build, eat, communicate, wage war, create art, travel, and worship. Some, such as stone, iron, and bronze, lend their names to the ages. Others, such as gold, silver, and diamond, contributed to the rise and fall of empires. How would history have unfolded without glass, paper, steel, cement, or gunpowder? The impulse to master our material world has guided the course of history since the dawn of time. In The Substance of Civilization, Sass demonstrates how substances and civilizations have evolved together. Moving from the Stone Age to the Age of Silicon, from the days of prehistoric survival to the cutting edge of nanotechnology, this fascinating and accessible book connects the worlds of minerals and molecules to the sweep of human history, and predicts what materials will dominate the century ahead. “Sass, a professor at Cornell University and a writer of both affability and precision, bridges the divide between history and science . . . and provides diverse and illuminating examples with unflagging and infectious enthusiasm.” —Booklist “Gobs of wonderful trivia.” —Kirkus Reviews

Materials for Engineering

Author: J Martin

Publisher: Woodhead Publishing

ISBN: 1845691601

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 256

View: 1289

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This third edition of what has become a modern classic presents a lively overview of Materials Science which is ideal for students of Structural Engineering. It contains chapters on the structure of engineering materials, the determination of mechanical properties, metals and alloys, glasses and ceramics, organic polymeric materials and composite materials. It contains a section with thought-provoking questions as well as a series of useful appendices. Tabulated data in the body of the text, and the appendices, have been selected to increase the value of Materials for engineering as a permanent source of reference to readers throughout their professional lives. The second edition was awarded Choice’s Outstanding Academic Title award in 2003. This third edition includes new information on emerging topics and updated reading lists.

The Material World

Author: Rodney Cotterill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316582515

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: N.A

View: 7348

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Using the cosmos as a backdrop, Rodney Cotterill delivers a fascinating journey of Nature's materials, from the atom to the living organism. This is a beautifully illustrated, expanded account of the highly praised Cambridge Guide to the Material World. The author seamlessly blends the physics, chemistry and biology of Nature, portraying matter with all its elegance and flaws. Although the book is divided into material types, the author connects concepts and pinpoints commonalities between the inorganic and organic domains. It challenges the reader to question our structured view of the world and whether this limits our scientific endeavour, aptly demonstrated by the new chapter devoted exclusively to the mind. Through the breadth of topics and engaging prose, this book will act as a superb introduction to material science for students and those intrigued by the material world we live in.

Built

The Hidden Stories Behind our Structures

Author: Roma Agrawal

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408870347

Category: Architecture

Page: 320

View: 1868

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Imagine you woke up one morning to find everything created by engineers had disappeared. What would you see? No cars, no houses; no phones, bridges or roads. No tunnels under tidal rivers, no soaring skyscrapers. The impact that engineering has had on the human experience is undeniable, but it is also often invisible. In BUILT, structural engineer Roma Agrawal takes a unique look at how construction has evolved from the mud huts of our ancestors to skyscrapers of steel that reach hundreds of metres into the sky. She unearths how engineers have tunnelled through kilometres of solid mountains; how they've bridged across the widest and deepest of rivers, and tamed Nature's precious – and elusive – water resources. She tells vivid tales of the visionaries who created the groundbreaking materials in the Pantheon's record-holding concrete dome and the frame of the record-breaking Eiffel Tower. Through the lens of an engineer, Roma examines tragedies like the collapse of the Quebec Bridge, highlighting the precarious task of ensuring people's safety they hold at every step. With colourful stories of her life-long fascination with buildings – and her own hand-drawn illustrations – Roma reveals the extraordinary secret lives of structures.

The Scientists

A History of Science Told Through the Lives of Its Greatest Inventors

Author: John R. Gribbin

Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks

ISBN: 0812967887

Category: Science

Page: 646

View: 2708

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Creates a history of human scientific achievement as revealed by the lives and individual accomplishments of such scientists as Andreas Vesalius, Nicholaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Charles Darwin, Galileo, and Gregor Mendel.

Wild things

the material culture of everyday life

Author: Judy Attfield

Publisher: Berg Publishers

ISBN: 9781859733646

Category: Art

Page: 318

View: 2539

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What do things mean? What does the life of everyday objects after the check-out reveal about people and their material worlds? Has the quest for 'the real thing' become so important because the high tech world of total virtuality threatens to engulf us? This pioneering book bridges design theory and anthropology to offer a new and challenging way of understanding the changing meanings of contemporary human-object relations. The act of consumption is only the starting point in objects' 'lives'. Thereafter they are transformed and invested with new meanings that reflect and assert who we are. Defining design as 'things with attitude' differentiates the highly visible fashionable object from ordinary artefacts that are taken for granted. Through case studies ranging from reproduction furniture to fashion and textiles to 'clutter', the author traces the connection between objects and authenticity, ephemerality and self-identity. But beyond this, she shows the materiality of the everyday in terms of space, time and the body and suggests a transition with the passing of time from embodiment to disembodiment. Shortlisted for the Design History Society Scholarship Prize 2001-2002

Rust

The Longest War

Author: Jonathan Waldman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451691599

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 4135

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An environmental journalist traces the historical war against rust, revealing how rust-related damage costs more than all other natural disasters combined and how it is combated by industrial workers, the government, universities and everyday people.

Periodic Tales

A Cultural History of the Elements, from Arsenic to Zinc

Author: Hugh Aldersey-Williams

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 006207881X

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 4566

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In the spirit of A Short History of Nearly Everything comes Periodic Tales. Award-winning science writer Hugh Andersey-Williams offers readers a captivating look at the elements—and the amazing, little-known stories behind their discoveries. Periodic Tales is an energetic and wide-ranging book of innovations and innovators, of superstition and science and the myriad ways the chemical elements are woven into our culture, history, and language. It will delight readers of Genome, Einstein’s Dreams, Longitude, and The Age of Wonder.

The Perfectionists

How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World

Author: Simon Winchester

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062652575

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5945

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The revered New York Times bestselling author traces the development of technology from the Industrial Age to the Digital Age to explore the single component crucial to advancement—precision—in a superb history that is both an homage and a warning for our future. The rise of manufacturing could not have happened without an attention to precision. At the dawn of the Industrial Revolution in eighteenth-century England, standards of measurement were established, giving way to the development of machine tools—machines that make machines. Eventually, the application of precision tools and methods resulted in the creation and mass production of items from guns and glass to mirrors, lenses, and cameras—and eventually gave way to further breakthroughs, including gene splicing, microchips, and the Hadron Collider. Simon Winchester takes us back to origins of the Industrial Age, to England where he introduces the scientific minds that helped usher in modern production: John Wilkinson, Henry Maudslay, Joseph Bramah, Jesse Ramsden, and Joseph Whitworth. It was Thomas Jefferson who later exported their discoveries to the fledgling United States, setting the nation on its course to become a manufacturing titan. Winchester moves forward through time, to today’s cutting-edge developments occurring around the world, from America to Western Europe to Asia. As he introduces the minds and methods that have changed the modern world, Winchester explores fundamental questions. Why is precision important? What are the different tools we use to measure it? Who has invented and perfected it? Has the pursuit of the ultra-precise in so many facets of human life blinded us to other things of equal value, such as an appreciation for the age-old traditions of craftsmanship, art, and high culture? Are we missing something that reflects the world as it is, rather than the world as we think we would wish it to be? And can the precise and the natural co-exist in society?

Eight Amazing Engineering Stories

Using the Elements to Create Extraordinary Technologies

Author: Bill Hammack,Patrick Ryan,Nick Ziech

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 9780983966135

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 202

View: 367

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Eight Amazing Engineering Stories reveals the stories behind how engineers use specific elements to create the material world around us. In eight chapters, the EngineerGuy team exposes the magnificence of the innovation and engineering of digital camera imagers, tiny accelerometers, atomic clocks, enriched uranium, batteries, microwave ovens, lasers, and anodized metals. In addition, short primers cover the scientific principles underlying the engineering, including waves, nuclear structure, and electronic transitions. "In Depth" sections cover entropy, semiconductors, and the mathematics of capacitors. Eight Amazing Engineering Stories forms the basis of the fourth series of EngineerGuy videos found on-line.

The New Science of Strong Materials

Or Why You Don't Fall Through the Floor

Author: J E Gordon

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141927704

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 288

View: 8472

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Why isn't wood weaker that it is? Why isn't steel stronger? Why does glass sometimes shatter and sometimes bend like spring? Why do ships break in half? What is a liquid and is treacle one? All these are questions about the nature of materials. All of them are vital to engineers but also fascinating as scientific problems. During the 250 years up to the 1920s and 1930s they had been answered largely by seeing how materials behaved in practice. But materials continued to do things that they "ought" not to have done. Only in the last 40 years have these questions begun to be answered by a new approach. Material scientists have started to look more deeply into the make-up of materials. They have found many surprises; above all, perhaps, that how a material behaves depends on how perfectly - or imperfectly - its atoms are arranged. Using both SI and imperial units, Professor Gordon's account of material science is a demonstration of the sometimes curious and entertaining ways in which scientists isolate and solve problems.

The Clockwork Universe

saac Newto, Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern WorldI

Author: Edward Dolnick

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062042262

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9058

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New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history—when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world. Dolnick’s earth-changing story of Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the birth of modern science is at once an entertaining romp through the annals of academic history, in the vein of Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, and a captivating exploration of a defining time for scientific progress, in the tradition of Richard Holmes’ The Age of Wonder.

The Disappearing Spoon

And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements

Author: Sam Kean

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 9780316089081

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 3775

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From New York Times bestselling author Sam Kean comes incredible stories of science, history, finance, mythology, the arts, medicine, and more, as told by the Periodic Table. Why did Gandhi hate iodine (I, 53)? How did radium (Ra, 88) nearly ruin Marie Curie's reputation? And why is gallium (Ga, 31) the go-to element for laboratory pranksters?* The Periodic Table is a crowning scientific achievement, but it's also a treasure trove of adventure, betrayal, and obsession. These fascinating tales follow every element on the table as they play out their parts in human history, and in the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them. THE DISAPPEARING SPOON masterfully fuses science with the classic lore of invention, investigation, and discovery--from the Big Bang through the end of time. *Though solid at room temperature, gallium is a moldable metal that melts at 84 degrees Fahrenheit. A classic science prank is to mold gallium spoons, serve them with tea, and watch guests recoil as their utensils disappear.