The American Century in Europe

Author: R. Laurence Moore,Maurizio Vaudagna

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501728946

Category: History

Page: 304

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The notion of an American Century has fallen out of favor in recent years—historians prefer to focus on the United States as part of a transatlantic community. The contributors to this volume edited by R. Laurence Moore and Maurizio Vaudagna seek to understand how the exercise of American power was in crucial ways shaped and limited by the historic ties of the United States to Europe. They evaluate the impact of the "American Century" (as publisher Henry R. Luce named it in 1941) from Woodrow Wilson's dream of a new world order, to Cold War economic policies, to more recent American cultural imperialism and its immediate descendent, American-led globalization. The American Century in Europe gathers an international group of scholars who explore the ways twentieth-century American power (diplomatic, cultural, and economic) has been felt across the Atlantic. The authors demonstrate that the American Century was marked less by American hegemony than by reciprocal influence between the United States and Europe. The scale of American wealth certainly guaranteed influence abroad, but as the essays demonstrate, the American thirst for trade just as surely opened America's borders to cultures from around the world.

The American Century

A History of the United States Since 1941:

Author: Walter LaFeber,Richard Polenberg,Nancy Woloch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317370422

Category: History

Page: 552

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The new edition of this classic text for courses on recent U.S. history covers the story of contemporary America from World War II into the second decade of the twenty-first century with new coverage of the Obama presidency and the 2012 elections. Written by three highly respected scholars, the book seamlessly blends political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic themes into an authoritative and readable account of our increasingly complex national story. The seventh edition retains its affordability and conciseness while continuing to add the most recent scholarship. Each chapter contains a special feature section devoted to cultural topics including the arts and architecture, sports and recreation, technology and education. Enhancing the students' learning experience is the addition of web links to each of these features to provide complementary visual study tools. An American Century instructor site provides instructors who adopt the book with high interest features--illustrations, photos, maps, quizzes, an elaboration of key themes in the book, PowerPoint presentations, and lecture launchers on topics including the "Military-Industrial Complex" Speech by Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Tet Offensive, and the prospects for a Second American Century. In addition, students have free access to a multimedia primary source archive of materials carefully selected to support the themes of each chapter.

Foundations of the American Century

The Ford, Carnegie, and Rockefeller Foundations in the Rise of American Power

Author: Inderjeet Parmar

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231517939

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

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Inderjeet Parmar reveals the complex interrelations, shared mindsets, and collaborative efforts of influential public and private organizations in the building of American hegemony. Focusing on the involvement of the Ford, Rockefeller, and Carnegie foundations in U.S. foreign affairs, Parmar traces the transformation of America from an "isolationist" nation into the world's only superpower, all in the name of benevolent stewardship. Parmar begins in the 1920s with the establishment of these foundations and their system of top-down, elitist, scientific giving, which focused more on managing social, political, and economic change than on solving modern society's structural problems. Consulting rare documents and other archival materials, he recounts how the American intellectuals, academics, and policy makers affiliated with these organizations institutionalized such elitism, which then bled into the machinery of U.S. foreign policy and became regarded as the essence of modernity. America hoped to replace Britain in the role of global hegemon and created the necessary political, ideological, military, and institutional capacity to do so, yet far from being objective, the Ford, Rockefeller, and Carnegie foundations often advanced U.S. interests at the expense of other nations. Incorporating case studies of American philanthropy in Nigeria, Chile, and Indonesia, Parmar boldly exposes the knowledge networks underwriting American dominance in the twentieth century.

The American Century

The Rise and Decline of the United States as a World Power

Author: Donald Wallace White

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300078787

Category: History

Page: 551

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From a wide range of sources the author identifies major trends in past American foreign policy and describes the decline of American power that has been in abeyance since the end of the Vietnam War.

Why the American Century?

Author: Olivier Zunz

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226994628

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 1777

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Ever since Henry Luce, the publisher of Tims and Life, proclaimed in 1941 that the twentieth century is the "American Century," we have been trying to understand our role in it. In a bold reinterpretation of our country's rise to world power, Olivier Zunz shows how Americans appropriated the twentieth century; America's ascent was not the result of Europe's self-destruction. By the Second World War, Zunz argues, American policymakers, corporate managers, engineers, and social scientists were managing the country from within a powerful matrix of institutions devoted to festering new knowledge. These men and women promoted a new social contract of abundance which was capable, in theory, of deradicalizing class, and their efforts helped create an American middle class defined by consumer behavior. In the name of democracy, they promoted a controversial ideology that stressed the value of respecting differences among people. The result was a culture that allowed Americans to intervene on the world scene with the justification that they were right in doing so.

Globalization and the American Century

Author: Alfred E. Eckes, Jr,Thomas W. Zeiler

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521009065

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 343

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A bold new approach to American history and diplomacy in the twentieth century.

HENRY KISSINGER AND THE AMERICAN CENTURY

Author: Jeremi Suri

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674281942

Category: History

Page: 369

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What made Henry Kissinger the kind of diplomat he was? What experiences and influences shaped his worldview and provided the framework for his approach to international relations? Suri offers a thought-provoking, interpretive study of one of the most influential and controversial political figures of the twentieth century.


The End of the American Century

Author: David S. Mason

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742557024

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 7517

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This compelling and persuasive book is the first to explore all of the interrelated aspects of America's decline. Hard-hitting and provocative, yet measured and clearly written, The End of the American Century demonstrates the phases of social, economic, and international decline that mark the end of a period of world dominance that began with World War II. David S. Mason convincingly shows that the war on terror and the Iraq War have exacerbated American domestic weakness and malaise and tarnished its image and stature in the world community. The collapse of the U.S. financial system is the culmination of decades of accumulated debt by government and consumers alike. As the dynamic economies of India and China and the revitalized European Union overtake the United States, we will witness a fundamental transformation of the global scene. This transition will require huge adjustments for American citizens and political leaders alike, but in the end, Mason argues, Americans—and the world—will be better off with a less profligate, more interdependent United States.

MacArthur and the American Century

A Reader

Author: William M. Leary

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803280205

Category: History

Page: 522

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General Douglas MacArthur has been hailed as the greatest soldier in American history. While not everyone would agree with that assessment, there is no question that MacArthur played a prominent role in the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century. A distinguished combat soldier during World War I and an innovative educator at West Point in the 1920s, MacArthur became the army's chief of staff during the Great Depression. He went abroad in the 1930s to prepare the Philippines for war. His stand against the Japanese following Pearl Harbor made him a national hero, and his subsequent campaign against Japanese forces in the Southwest Pacific only added to his reputation. The Korean War gave MacArthur a final opportunity to display his military skills. MacArthur and the American Century assembles for the first time a nuanced and full scrutiny of MacArthur's entire career. Essays by such experts as Stanley L. Falk and D. Clayton James accompany materials by Dwight D. Eisenhower and MacArthur himself, providing analysis and evaluation of the immense impact this dramatic figure had on war, peace, and the American imagination.

DDT and the American Century

Global Health, Environmental Politics, and the Pesticide That Changed the World

Author: David Kinkela

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807869307

Category: History

Page: 272

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Praised for its ability to kill insects effectively and cheaply and reviled as an ecological hazard, DDT continues to engender passion across the political spectrum as one of the world's most controversial chemical pesticides. In DDT and the American Century, David Kinkela chronicles the use of DDT around the world from 1941 to the present with a particular focus on the United States, which has played a critical role in encouraging the global use of the pesticide. Kinkela's study offers a unique approach to understanding both this contentious chemical and modern environmentalism in an international context.

Making the American Century

Essays on the Political Culture of Twentieth Century America

Author: Bruce J. Schulman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199845409

Category: History

Page: 336

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The twentieth century has been popularly seen as "the American Century," a long period in which the United States had amassed the economic resources, the political and military strength, and the moral prestige to assume global leadership. By century's end, the trajectory of American politics, the sense of ever waxing federal power, and the nation's place in the world seemed less assured. Americans of many stripes came to contest the standard narratives of nation building and international hegemony charted by generations of historians. In this volume, a group of distinguished U.S. historians confronts the teleological view of the inexorable transformation of the United States into a modern nation. The contributors analyze a host of ways in which local places were drawn into a wider polity and culture, while at the same time revealing how national and international structures and ideas created new kinds of local movements and local energies. Rather than seeing the century as a series of conflicts between liberalism and conservatism, they illustrate the ways in which each of these political forces shaped its efforts over the other's cumulative achievements, accommodating to shifts in government, social mores, and popular culture. They demonstrate that international connections have transformed domestic life in myriad ways and, in turn, that the American presence in the world has been shaped by its distinctive domestic political culture. Finally, they break down boundaries between the public and private sectors, showcasing the government's role in private life and how private organizations influenced national politics. Revisiting and revising many of the chestnuts of American political history, this volume challenges received wisdom about the twentieth-century American experience.

Architects of the American Century

Individuals and Institutions in Twentieth-century U.S. Foreign Policymaking

Author: David F. Schmitz,T. Christopher Jespersen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 199

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This volume of essays focuses on key individuals & institutions in the making of U.S. foreign policy during the 20th century. Spanning from Woodrow Wilson to Jimmy Carter & covering the gamut of America's global investments, it engages the issues of domestic politics, popular culture, geographical & strategic interests, economics, technology, & perceptions of other nations - be they allies, long-time friends or foes & potentially disruptive states - & provides important insights into the impact individuals & bureaucratic institutions have had on the making of U.S. foreign policy. Paper, ISBN 1-879176-35-1, US $19.95, 200+ pp., index, February 1999. Vol. 4 of Imprint Studies in International Relations (ISBN 1-879176-31-3). Order from Imprint Publications, 230 East Ohio St., Chicago, IL 60611. 312-337-9268, FAX: 312-337-9622, e-mail: [email protected], add $5 for single copy shipping, credit cards accepted.www.imprint-chicago.com

1898

The Birth of the American Century

Author: David Traxel

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307480801

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1974

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In 1898: The Birth of the American Century, David Traxel tells the story of a watershed year, a year of foreign conflict, extravagant adventure, and breakneck social change that forged a new America—a sudden empire with many far-flung possessions, a dynamic new player upon the global stage. At the heart of this vivid, anecdotal history is a masterly account of the Spanish-American War, the "splendid little war" that garnered the nation Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. From the sinking of the Maine in waters off Havana to Teddy Roosevelt's rough riders and the triumph of Admiral Dewey, here is the lightning-swift military episode that transformed America into a world power. Here too are many stories not so often told—the bloody first successes of the new United Mine Workers, the tentative beginnings of the Ford Motor Company, the million-dollar launch of the Uneeda Biscuit—each in its way as important as the harbinger of the American century. Compulsively readable, frequently humorous, utterly fascinating in its every detail, 1898 is popular history at its finest. From the Trade Paperback edition.

After Suez

Adrift in the American Century

Author: Martin Woollacott,Angela Woollacott

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 9781845111762

Category: History

Page: 166

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Fifty years after Antony Eden's fateful decision to take on the Egyptian President, Gamal Abdel Nasser, veteran Guardian journalist Martin Woollacott brings to life the arguments, personalities and events surrounding the crisis, and follows its disastrous legacy. He draws on four decades of foreign affairs reporting to show how it changed the Middle East, and the world. More than anything else Suez exposed with brutal clarity that Britain cannot pursue any policy in the world without the support of America. Woollacott's richly fascinating book shows both how Suez led to where we are today, and how parlously Blair and Bush have failed to learn its lessons.

Medievalist Comics and the American Century

Author: Chris Bishop

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496808517

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

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The comic book has become an essential icon of the American Century, an era defined by optimism in the face of change and by recognition of the intrinsic value of democracy and modernization. For many, the Middle Ages stand as an antithesis to these ideals, and yet medievalist comics have emerged and endured, even thrived alongside their superhero counterparts. Chris Bishop presents a reception history of medievalist comics, setting them against a greater backdrop of modern American history. From its genesis in the 1930s to the present, Bishop surveys the medievalist comic, its stories, characters, settings, and themes drawn from the European Middle Ages. Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant emerged from an America at odds with monarchy, but still in love with King Arthur. Green Arrow remains the continuation of a long fascination with Robin Hood that has become as central to the American identity as it was to the British. The Mighty Thor reflects the legacy of Germanic migration into the United States. The rugged individualism of Conan the Barbarian owes more to the western cowboy than it does to the continental knight-errant. In the narrative of Red Sonja, we can trace a parallel history of feminism. Bishop regards these comics as not merely happenchance, but each success (Prince Valiant and The Mighty Thor) or failure (Beowulf: Dragon Slayer) as a result and an indicator of certain American preoccupations amid a larger cultural context. Intrinsically modernist paragons of pop-culture ephemera, American comics have ironically continued to engage with the European Middle Ages. Bishop illuminates some of the ways in which we use an imagined past to navigate the present and plots some possible futures as we valiantly shape a new century.

Puerto Rico in the American Century

A History since 1898

Author: César J. Ayala,Rafael Bernabe

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807895535

Category: History

Page: 448

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Offering a comprehensive overview of Puerto Rico's history and evolution since the installation of U.S. rule, Cesar Ayala and Rafael Bernabe connect the island's economic, political, cultural, and social past. Puerto Rico in the American Century explores Puerto Ricans in the diaspora as well as the island residents, who experience an unusual and daily conundrum: they consider themselves a distinct people but are part of the American political system; they have U.S. citizenship but are not represented in the U.S. Congress; and they live on land that is neither independent nor part of the United States. Highlighting both well-known and forgotten figures from Puerto Rican history, Ayala and Bernabe discuss a wide range of topics, including literary and cultural debates and social and labor struggles that previous histories have neglected. Although the island's political economy remains dependent on the United States, the authors also discuss Puerto Rico's situation in light of world economies. Ayala and Bernabe argue that the inability of Puerto Rico to shake its colonial legacy reveals the limits of free-market capitalism, a break from which would require a renewal of the long tradition of labor and social activism in Puerto Rico in connection with similar currents in the United States.


The American Century

Author: N.A

Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 710

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An overview of the people and events of the twentieth century follows America's rise to political and cultural preeminence

In the Shadows of the American Century

The Rise and Decline of US Global Power

Author: Alfred W. McCoy

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN: 1786074168

Category: History

Page: 359

View: 3399

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As the dust settled after World War II, America controlled half the world’s manufacturing capacity. By the end of the Cold War it possessed nearly half the planet’s military forces, spread across eight hundred bases, and much of its wealth. Beyond what was on display, the United States had also built a formidable diplomatic and clandestine apparatus. Indeed, more than anything else, it is this secretive tier of global surveillance and covert operations that distinguishes the US from the great empires of the past. But even as it has secured an unrivalled power network through satellites, drones and cyberwarfare, recent years have seen America’s share of the global economy diminish, its diplomatic alliances falter and its claim to moral leadership abandoned. Meanwhile, China is emerging as the world’s economic powerhouse, poised to integrate the ‘world island’ stretching from Shanghai to Madrid and lay claim to the South China Sea. The nineteenth century belonged to Britain and the twentieth to America. Will China take the twenty-first?