The Audible Past

Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction

Author: Jonathan Sterne

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822330134

Category: Music

Page: 450

View: 6644

Release On

DIVCultural study of the development of sound technology in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries from telephones and stethoscopes to record players./div

The Audible Past

Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction

Author: Jonathan Sterne

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822384250

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 468

View: 1869

Release On

The Audible Past explores the cultural origins of sound reproduction. It describes a distinctive sound culture that gave birth to the sound recording and the transmission devices so ubiquitous in modern life. With an ear for the unexpected, scholar and musician Jonathan Sterne uses the technological and cultural precursors of telephony, phonography, and radio as an entry point into a history of sound in its own right. Sterne studies the constantly shifting boundary between phenomena organized as "sound" and "not sound." In The Audible Past, this history crisscrosses the liminal regions between bodies and machines, originals and copies, nature and culture, and life and death. Blending cultural studies and the history of communication technology, Sterne follows modern sound technologies back through a historical labyrinth. Along the way, he encounters capitalists and inventors, musicians and philosophers, embalmers and grave robbers, doctors and patients, deaf children and their teachers, professionals and hobbyists, folklorists and tribal singers. The Audible Past tracks the connections between the history of sound and the defining features of modernity: from developments in medicine, physics, and philosophy to the tumultuous shifts of industrial capitalism, colonialism, urbanization, modern technology, and the rise of a new middle class. A provocative history of sound, The Audible Past challenges theoretical commonplaces such as the philosophical privilege of the speaking subject, the visual bias in theories of modernity, and static descriptions of nature. It will interest those in cultural studies, media and communication studies, the new musicology, and the history of technology.

MP3

The Meaning of a Format

Author: Jonathan Sterne

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822352877

Category: Computers

Page: 341

View: 5274

Release On

Jonathan Sterne shows that understanding the historical meaning of the MP3, the world's most common format for recorded audio, involves rethinking the place of digital technologies in the broader universe of twentieth-century communication history.

The Sound Studies Reader

Author: Jonathan Sterne

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415771307

Category: Music

Page: 566

View: 1944

Release On

"The Sound Studies Reader is a groundbreaking anthology blending recent work that self-consciously describes itself as 'sound studies' with earlier and lesser known scholarship on sound. The collection begins with an introduction to welcome novice readers to the field and acquaint them with key themes and concepts in sound studies. Individual section introductions give readers further background on the essays and an extensive up to date bibliography for further reading in 'sound studies' make this an original and accessible guide to the field"--

Sound Recording

The Life Story of a Technology

Author: David Morton

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801883989

Category: Music

Page: 215

View: 4524

Release On

Looks at the history of recorded music and technology of the industry from Thomas Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1876 to the MP3 players.

The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies

Author: Trevor Pinch,Karin Bijsterveld

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0195388941

Category: Music

Page: 593

View: 623

Release On

Written by the world's leading scholars and researchers in the emerging field of sound studies, The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies offers new and fully engaging perspectives on the significance of sound in its material and cultural forms. The book considers sounds and music as experienced in such diverse settings as shop floors, laboratories, clinics, design studios, homes, and clubs, across an impressively broad range of historical periods and national and cultural contexts.Science has traditionally been understood as a visual matter, a study which has historically been undertaken with optical technologies such as slides, graphs, and telescopes. This book questions that notion powerfully by showing how listening has contributed to scientific practice. Sounds have always been a part of human experience, shaping and transforming the world in which we live in ways that often go unnoticed. Sounds and music, the authors argue, are embedded in the fabric of everyday life, art, commerce, and politics in ways which impact our perception of the world. Through an extraordinarily diverse set of case studies, authors illustrate how sounds -- from the sounds of industrialization, to the sounds of automobiles, to sounds in underwater music and hip-hop, to the sounds of nanotechnology -- give rise to new forms listening practices. In addition, the book discusses the rise of new public problems such as noise pollution, hearing loss, and the "end" of the amateur musician that stem from the spread and appropriation of new sound- and music-related technologies, analog and digital, in many domains of life.Rich in vivid and detailed examples and compelling case studies, and featuring a companion website of listening samples, this remarkable volume boldly challenges readers to rethink the way they hear and understand the world.

A Century of Recorded Music

Listening to Musical History

Author: Timothy Day

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300094015

Category: Music

Page: 306

View: 414

Release On

Looks at the history of recording technology and its effect on music, including artistic performance, listening habits, and audience participation.

Keywords in Sound

Author: David Novak,Matt Sakakeeny

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822375494

Category: Music

Page: 272

View: 2745

Release On

In twenty essays on subjects such as noise, acoustics, music, and silence, Keywords in Sound presents a definitive resource for sound studies, and a compelling argument for why studying sound matters. Each contributor details their keyword's intellectual history, outlines its role in cultural, social and political discourses, and suggests possibilities for further research. Keywords in Sound charts the philosophical debates and core problems in defining, classifying and conceptualizing sound, and sets new challenges for the development of sound studies. Contributors. Andrew Eisenberg, Veit Erlmann, Patrick Feaster, Steven Feld, Daniel Fisher, Stefan Helmreich, Charles Hirschkind, Deborah Kapchan, Mara Mills, John Mowitt, David Novak, Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier, Thomas Porcello, Tom Rice, Tara Rodgers, Matt Sakakeeny, David Samuels, Mark M. Smith, Benjamin Steege, Jonathan Sterne, Amanda Weidman

Japanoise

Music at the Edge of Circulation

Author: David Novak

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 082235392X

Category: Music

Page: 292

View: 7287

Release On

Drawing on more than a decade of research in Japan and the United States, David Novak traces the "cultural feedback" that generates and sustains Noise, an underground music genre combining distortion and electronic effects.

Wired for Sound

Engineering and Technologies in Sonic Cultures

Author: Paul D. Greene,Thomas Porcello

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819570621

Category: Music

Page: 304

View: 6211

Release On

Winner of the Society for Ethnmusicology's Klaus Wachsmann Award (2006) Wired for Sound is the first anthology to address the role of sound engineering technologies in the shaping of contemporary global music. Wired sound is at the basis of digital audio editing, multi-track recording, and other studio practices that have powerfully impacted the world's music. Distinctions between musicians and engineers increasingly blur, making it possible for people around the globe to imagine new sounds and construct new musical aesthetics. This collection of 11 essays employs primarily ethnographical, but also historical and psychological, approaches to examine a range of new, technology-intensive musics and musical practices such as: fusions of Indian film-song rhythms, heavy metal, and gamelan in Jakarta; urban Nepali pop which juxtaposes heavy metal, Tibetan Buddhist ritual chant, rap, and Himalayan folksongs; collaborations between Australian aboriginals and sound engineers; the production of “heaviness” in heavy metal music; and the production of the “Austin sound.” This anthology is must reading for anyone interested in the global character of contemporary music technology. CONTRIBUTORS: Harris M. Berger, Beverley Diamond, Cornelia Fales, Ingemar Grandin, Louise Meintjes, Frederick J. Moehn, Karl Neunfeldt, Timothy D. Taylor, Jeremy Wallach.

Selling Sounds

Author: David Suisman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674054687

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 4643

Release On

From Tin Pan Alley to grand opera, player-pianos to phonograph records, David Suisman explores the rise of music as big business and the creation of a radically new musical culture. Provocative, original, and lucidly written, Selling Sounds reveals the commercial architecture of America’s musical life.

Audible Empire

Music, Global Politics, Critique

Author: Ronald Radano,Tejumola Olaniyan

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822374943

Category: Music

Page: 432

View: 4794

Release On

Audible Empire rethinks the processes and mechanisms of empire and shows how musical practice has been crucial to its spread around the globe. Music is a means of comprehending empire as an audible formation, and the contributors highlight how it has been circulated, consumed, and understood through imperial logics. These fifteen interdisciplinary essays cover large swaths of genre, time, politics, and geography, and include topics such as the affective relationship between jazz and cigarettes in interwar China; the sonic landscape of the U.S.– Mexico border; the critiques of post-9/11 U.S. empire by desi rappers; and the role of tonality in the colonization of Africa. Whether focusing on Argentine tango, theorizing anticolonialist sound, or examining the music industry of postapartheid South Africa, the contributors show how the audible has been a central component in the creation of imperialist notions of reason, modernity, and culture. In doing so, they allow us to hear how empire is both made and challenged. Contributors: Kofi Agawu, Philip V. Bohlman. Michael Denning, Brent Hayes Edwards, Nan Enstad, Andrew Jones, Josh Kun, Morgan Luker, Jairo Moreno, Tejumola Olaniyan, Marc Perry, Ronald Radano, Nitasha Sharma, Micol Seigel, Gavin Steingo, Penny Von Eschen, Amanda Weidman.

Noise

A Human History of Sound and Listening

Author: David Hendy

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 006228309X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 3768

Release On

What if history had a sound track? What would it tell us about ourselves? Based on a thirty-part BBC Radio series and podcast, Noise explores the human dramas that have revolved around sound at various points in the last 100,000 years, allowing us to think in fresh ways about the meaning of our collective past. Though we might see ourselves inhabiting a visual world, our lives have always been hugely influenced by our need to hear and be heard. To tell the story of sound—music and speech, but also echoes, chanting, drumbeats, bells, thunder, gunfire, the noise of crowds, the rumbles of the human body, laughter, silence, conversations, mechanical sounds, noisy neighbors, musical recordings, and radio—is to explain how we learned to overcome our fears about the natural world, perhaps even to control it; how we learned to communicate with, understand, and live alongside our fellow beings; how we've fought with one another for dominance; how we've sought to find privacy in an increasingly noisy world; and how we've struggled with our emotions and our sanity. Oratory in ancient Rome was important not just for the words spoken but for the sounds made—the tone, the cadence, the pitch of the voice—how that voice might have been transformed by the environment in which it was heard and how the audience might have responded to it. For the Native American tribes first encountering the European colonists, to lose one's voice was to lose oneself. In order to dominate the Native Americans, European colonists went to great effort to silence them, to replace their "demonic" "roars" with the more familiar "bugles, speaking trumpets, and gongs." Breaking up the history of sound into prehistoric noise, the age of oratory, the sounds of religion, the sounds of power and revolt, the rise of machines, and what he calls our "amplified age," Hendy teases out continuities and breaches in our long relationship with sound in order to bring new meaning to the human story.

Aurality

Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia

Author: Ana María Ochoa Gautier

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822376261

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 6523

Release On

In this audacious book, Ana María Ochoa Gautier explores how listening has been central to the production of notions of language, music, voice, and sound that determine the politics of life. Drawing primarily from nineteenth-century Colombian sources, Ochoa Gautier locates sounds produced by different living entities at the juncture of the human and nonhuman. Her "acoustically tuned" analysis of a wide array of texts reveals multiple debates on the nature of the aural. These discussions were central to a politics of the voice harnessed in the service of the production of different notions of personhood and belonging. In Ochoa Gautier's groundbreaking work, Latin America and the Caribbean emerge as a historical site where the politics of life and the politics of expression inextricably entangle the musical and the linguistic, knowledge and the sensorial.

A Spiral Way

How the Phonograph Changed Ethnography

Author: Erika Brady

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604737738

Category: Music

Page: 173

View: 9531

Release On

The invention of the cylinder phonograph at the end of the nineteenth century opened up a new world for cultural research. Indeed, Edison's talking machine became one of the basic tools of anthropology. It not only equipped researchers with the means of preserving folk songs but it also enabled them to investigate a wide spectrum of distinct vocal expressions in the emerging fields of anthropology and folklore. Ethnographers grasped its huge potential and fanned out through regional America to record rituals, stories, word lists, and songs in isolated cultures. From the outset the federal government helped fuel the momentum to record cultures that were at risk of being lost. Through the Bureau of American Ethnology, the Smithsonian Institution took an active role in preserving native heritage. It supported projects to make phonographic documentation of American Indian language, music, and rituals before developing technologies and national expansion might futher undermine them. This study of the early phonograph's impact shows traditional ethnography being transformed, for attitudes of both ethnographers and performers were reshaped by this exciting technology. In the presence of the phonograph both fieldwork and the materials collected were revolutionized. By radically altering the old research modes, the phonograph brought the disciplines of anthropology and folklore into the modern era. At first the instrument was as strange and new to the fieldworkers as it was to their subjects. To some the first encounter with the phonograph was a deeply unsettling experience. When it was demonstrated in 1878 before members of the National Academy of Sciences, several members of the audience fainted. Even its inventor was astonished. Of his first successful test of his tinfoil phonograph, Thomas A. Edison said, I was never taken so aback in my life. The cylinders that have survived from these times offer an unrivaled resource not only for contemporary scholarship but also for a grassroots renaissance of cultural and religious values. In tracing the historical interplay of the talking machine with field research, The Spiral Way underscores the natural adaptiblity of cultural study to this new technology. Erika Brady is an associate professor in the folk studies programs at Western Kentucky University. She served as technical consultant and researcher on the staff of the Federal Cylinder Project of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.

Electric Dreams

Computers in American Culture

Author: Ted Friedman

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814727395

Category: Computers

Page: 275

View: 9708

Release On

Electric Dreams turns to the past to trace the cultural history of computers. Ted Friedman charts the struggles to define the meanings of these powerful machines over more than a century, from the failure of Charles Babbage’s “difference engine” in the nineteenth century to contemporary struggles over file swapping, open source software, and the future of online journalism. To reveal the hopes and fears inspired by computers, Electric Dreams examines a wide range of texts, including films, advertisements, novels, magazines, computer games, blogs, and even operating systems. Electric Dreams argues that the debates over computers are critically important because they are how Americans talk about the future. In a society that in so many ways has given up on imagining anything better than multinational capitalism, cyberculture offers room to dream of different kinds of tomorrow.

Living Stereo

Histories and Cultures of Multichannel Sound

Author: Paul Théberge,Kyle Devine,Tom Everrett

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1623566657

Category: Music

Page: 304

View: 2734

Release On

The first comprehensive study of the historical significance of stereo sound in aural and musical culture.

City of Noise

Sound and Nineteenth-Century Paris

Author: Aimee Boutin

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252097262

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 1993

Release On

Beloved as the city of light, Paris in the nineteenth century sparked the acclaim of poets and the odium of the bourgeois with its distinctive sounds. Street vendors bellowed songs known as the Cris de Paris that had been associated with their trades since the Middle Ages; musicians itinerant and otherwise played for change; and flâneurs-writers, fascinated with the city's underside, listened and recorded much about what they heard. Aimée Boutin tours the sonic space that orchestrated the different, often conflicting sound cultures that defined the street ambience of Paris. Mining accounts that range from guidebooks to verse, Boutin braids literary, cultural, and social history to reconstruct a lost auditory environment. Throughout, impressions of street noise shape writers' sense of place and perception of modern social relations. As Boutin shows, the din of the Cris contrasted economic abundance with the disparities of the capital, old and new traditions, and the vibrancy of street commerce with an increasing bourgeois demand for quiet. In time, peddlers who provided the soundtrack for Paris's narrow streets yielded to modernity, with its taciturn shopkeepers and wide-open boulevards, and the fading songs of the Cris became a dirge for the passing of old ways.

The Poetics of Rock

Cutting Tracks, Making Records

Author: Albin Zak

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520232240

Category: Music

Page: 259

View: 9951

Release On

"Albin Zak's The Poetics of Rock is a brilliant and original study of how studio recordings of rock music have introduced an entirely new dimension of music composition. Bristling with acute insights and interpretations, this book should provide engaging reading for any serious student, scholar, or aficionado of rock, of composition, or of modern music culture in general."—Peter Manuel, author of Cassette Culture: Popular Music and Technology in North India "In The Poetics of Rock, Albin Zak offers an expert guide to how records are made, not only outlining in detail technical practices and procedures in a comprehensible way, but also thoughtfully engaging the myriad of aesthetic and musical issues that recording raises. This masterful study opens up important new areas of concern for rock and is a must-read for all scholars concerned with popular music and criticism."—John Covach, editor of Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis

Acoustic Communication

Author: Barry Truax

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781567505368

Category: Science

Page: 284

View: 6944

Release On

Establishes a model for understanding all acoustic and aural experiences in both traditional and radically altered forms.