A History of Broadcasting in the United States

Volume 2: The Golden Web: 1933 to 1953

Author: Erik Barnouw

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019802004X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 400

View: 7985

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Tells how radio and television became an integral part of American life, of how a toy became an industry and a force in politics, business, education, religion, and international affairs.

The Columbia History of American Television

Author: Gary Edgerton

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231512183

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 512

View: 6294

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Television is a form of media without equal. It has revolutionized the way we learn about and communicate with the world and has reinvented the way we experience ourselves and others. More than just cheap entertainment, TV is an undeniable component of our culture and contains many clues to who we are, what we value, and where we might be headed in the future. Media historian Gary R. Edgerton follows the technological developments and increasing cultural relevance of TV from its prehistory (before 1947) to the Network Era (1948-1975) and the Cable Era (1976-1994). He begins with the laying of the first telegraph line in 1844, which gave rise to the idea that images and sounds could be transmitted over long distances. He then considers the remodeling of television's look and purpose during World War II; the gender, racial, and ethnic components of its early broadcasts and audiences; its transformation of postwar America; and its function in the political life of the country. He talks of the birth of prime time and cable, the influence of innovators like Sylvester "Pat" Weaver, Roone Arledge, and Ted Turner, as well as television's entrance into the international market, describing the ascent of such programs as Dallas and The Cosby Show, and the impact these exports have had on transmitting American culture abroad. Edgerton concludes with a discerning look at our current Digital Era (1995-present) and the new forms of instantaneous communication that continue to change America's social, political, and economic landscape. Richly researched and engaging, Edgerton's history tracks television's growth into a convergent technology, a global industry, a social catalyst, a viable art form, and a complex and dynamic reflection of the American mind and character. It took only ten years for television to penetrate thirty-five million households, and by 1983, the average home kept their set on for more than seven hours a day. The Columbia History of American Television illuminates our complex relationship with this singular medium and provides historical and critical knowledge for understanding TV as a technology, an industry, an art form, and an institutional force.

Broadcast Hysteria

Orson Welles's War of the Worlds and the Art of Fake News

Author: A. Brad Schwartz

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0809031612

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9704

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The enthralling and never-told story of the War of the Worlds radio drama and its true aftermath On October 30, 1938, families across the country were gathered around their radios when their regular programming was interrupted by an announcer delivering news of a meteor strike in New Jersey. With increasing intensity, the announcer read bulletins describing terrifying war machines moving toward New York City. As the invading force approached, some listeners sat transfixed before their radios, while others ran to alert neighbors or call the police. Some even fled their homes in panic. But the broadcast was not breaking news--it was Orson Welles's adaptation of the H. G. Wells classic TheWar of the Worlds. In Broadcast Hysteria, A. Brad Schwartz examines the history behind the infamous radio play. Did it really spawn a wave of mass hysteria? Schwartz is the first to examine the hundreds of letters sent directly to Welles after the broadcast. He draws upon them, and hundreds more sent to the FCC, to recapture the roiling emotions of a bygone era, and his findings challenge conventional wisdom. Relatively few listeners believed an actual attack was under way. But even so, Schwartz shows that Welles's broadcast prompted a different kind of "mass panic" as Americans debated the bewitching power of the radio and the country's vulnerability in a time of crisis. Schwartz's original research, gifted storytelling, and thoughtful analysis makeBroadcast Hysteria a groundbreaking work of media history.

The Broadcast Century and Beyond

A Biography of American Broadcasting

Author: Robert L Hilliard,Michael C Keith

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1136027297

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 360

View: 3815

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The Broadcast Century and Beyond, 4th Edition, is a popular history of the most influential and innovative industry of the previous and current century. The story of broadcasting is told in a direct and informal style, blending personal insight and authoritative scholarship to fully capture the many facets of this dynamic industry. The book vividly depicts the events, people, programs, and companies that made television and radio dominant forms of communication. The ability of radio and television to educate, enlighten, and stimulate the contemporary mind is perhaps the most important of all modern technological developments. This text places the communication revolution in a comprehensive chronological context, allowing readers to fully grasp the media's profound impact on the political, social, and economic spheres.

Methods of Historical Analysis in Electronic Media

Author: Donald G. Godfrey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135607400

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 1294

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Methods of Historical Analysis in Electronic Media provides a foundation for historical research in electronic media by addressing the literature and the methods--traditional and the eclectic methods of scholarship as applied to electronic media. It is about history--broadcast electronic media history and history that has been broadcast, and also about the historiography, research written, and the research yet to be written. Divided into five parts, this book: *addresses the challenges in the application of the historical methods to broadcast history; *reviews the various methods appropriate for electronic-media research based on the nature of the object under study; *suggests new approaches to popular historical topics; *takes a broad topical look at history in broadcasting; and *provides a broad overview of what has been accomplished, a historian's challenges, and future research. Intended for students and researchers in broadcast history, Methods of Historical Analysis in Electronic Media provides an understanding of the qualitative methodological tools necessary for the study of electronic media history, and illustrates how to find primary sources for electronic media research.

Cool

How Air Conditioning Changed Everything

Author: Salvatore Basile

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN: 0823261778

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 288

View: 473

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It's July and it's 94 degrees Fahrenheit. What do you do? Blast the air conditioning. It's a modern miracle of convenience and cooling. How did it happen? Sal Basile's narrative history traces the origins one of the machines we take for granted. It's a contraption that makes the lists of "Greatest Inventions Ever"; at the same time, it's accused of causing global disaster. It has changed everything from architecture to people's food habits to their voting patterns, to even the way big business washes its windows. It has saved countless lives . . . while causing countless deaths. Most of us are glad it's there. But we don't know how, or when, it got there. It's air conditioning. For thousands of years, humankind attempted to do something about the slow torture of hot weather. Everything was tried: water power, slave power, electric power, ice made from steam engines and cold air made from deadly chemicals, "zephyrifers," refrigerated beds, ventilation amateurs and professional air-sniffers. It wasn't until 1902 when an engineer barely out of college developed the "Apparatus for Treating Air" a machine that could actually cool the indoors and everyone assumed it would instantly change the world. That wasn't the case. There was a time when people "ignored" hot weather while reading each day's list of heat-related deaths, women wore furs in the summertime, heatstroke victims were treated with bloodletting . . . and the notion of a machine to cool the air was considered preposterous, even sinful. The story of air conditioning is actually two stories: the struggle to perfect a cooling device, and the effort to convince people that they actually needed such a thing. With a cast of characters ranging from Leonardo da Vinci and Richard Nixon to Felix the Cat, Cool showcases the myriad reactions to air conditioning some of them dramatic, many others comical and wonderfully inconsistent as it was developed and presented to the world. Here is a unique perspective on air conditioning's fascinating history: how we rely so completely on it today, and how it might change radically tomorrow.

CBS’s Don Hollenbeck

An Honest Reporter in the Age of McCarthyism

Author: Loren Ghiglione

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231516894

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 7701

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Loren Ghiglione recounts the fascinating life and tragic suicide of Don Hollenbeck, the controversial newscaster who became a primary target of McCarthyism's smear tactics. Drawing on unsealed FBI records, private family correspondence, and interviews with Walter Cronkite, Mike Wallace, Charles Collingwood, Douglas Edwards, and more than one hundred other journalists, Ghiglione writes a balanced biography that cuts close to the bone of this complicated newsman and chronicles the stark consequences of the anti-Communist frenzy that seized America in the late 1940s and 1950s. Hollenbeck began his career at the Lincoln, Nebraska Journal (marrying the boss's daughter) before becoming an editor at William Randolph Hearst's rip-roaring Omaha Bee-News. He participated in the emerging field of photojournalism at the Associated Press; assisted in creating the innovative, ad-free PM newspaper in New York City; reported from the European theater for NBC radio during World War II; and anchored television newscasts at CBS during the era of Edward R. Murrow. Hollenbeck's pioneering, prize-winning radio program, CBS Views the Press (1947-1950), was a declaration of independence from a print medium that had dominated American newsmaking for close to 250 years. The program candidly criticized the prestigious New York Times, the Daily News (then the paper with the largest circulation in America), and Hearst's flagship Journal-American and popular morning tabloid Daily Mirror. For this honest work, Hollenbeck was attacked by conservative anti-Communists, especially Hearst columnist Jack O'Brian, and in 1954, plagued by depression, alcoholism, three failed marriages, and two network firings (and worried about a third), Hollenbeck took his own life. In his investigation of this amazing American character, Ghiglione reveals the workings of an industry that continues to fall victim to censorship and political manipulation. Separating myth from fact, CBS's Don Hollenbeck is the definitive portrait of a polarizing figure who became a symbol of America's tortured conscience.

Radio Propaganda and the Broadcasting of Hatred

Historical Development and Definitions

Author: K. Somerville

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137284153

Category: Political Science

Page: 275

View: 7004

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An exposition and analysis of the development of propaganda, focusing on how the development of radio transformed the delivery and impact of propaganda and led to the use of radio to incite hatred and violence.




United States History

A Selective Guide to Information Sources

Author: Ron Blazek,Anna H. Perrault

Publisher: Englewood, Colo. : Libraries Unlimited

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 411

View: 6564

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Annoteret bibliografi med overskrifterne: Sources of general importance to U.S. history; Politics and government; Diplomatic history and foreign affairs; Military history; Social, cultural, and intellectual history; Regional history; Economic history

Telecommunications

An Introduction to Radio, Television, and Other Electronic Media

Author: Lynne S. Gross

Publisher: WCB/McGraw-Hill

ISBN: N.A

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 490

View: 2545

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Mapping the Cultural Space of Journalism

How Journalists Distinguish News from Entertainment

Author: Samuel P. Winch

Publisher: Praeger Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 188

View: 732

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What is news? Can scandalous rumors emanating from supermarket tabloids be justifiable on television news programs? This study examines such issues in terms of the shifting boundaries between news and entertainment.

Manipulating the Ether

The Power of Broadcast Radio in Thirties America

Author: Robert John Brown

Publisher: McFarland Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 310

View: 4008

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Franklin D. Roosevelt was the first politician to recognize the power of radio. He appealed directly to the American people for support of his New Deal and for his foreign policy. Roosevelt's speeches and fireside chats were broadcast over networks only recently equipped with newsrooms. Listeners immediately learned of events they earlier would not have heard about for days. In those newsrooms, commentators began to interpret the news for average listeners, sometimes slanting it to reflect their own view. But it fell to a young star to demonstrate the full power of the medium. On October 30, 1938, Orson Welles' War of the Worlds broadcast brought widespread panic with its fictional newscast of an alien invasion. How Roosevelt used radio, how the news was reported, and the changes Welles caused are all detailed.


Choice

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

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Film

An International Bibliography

Author: Malte Hagener,Michael Töteberg

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Motion pictures

Page: 479

View: 789

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