The Twilight of American Culture

Author: Morris Berman

Publisher: Gerald Duckworth

ISBN: N.A

Category: Corporations

Page: 208

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An emerging cult classic about America's cultural meltdown--and a surprising solution. A prophetic examination of Western decline, "The Twilight of American Culture" provides one of the most caustic and surprising portraits of American society--and corporate mass mind culture-- to date.

The Twilight of the American Enlightenment

The 1950s and the Crisis of Liberal Belief

Author: George Marsden

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0465069770

Category: History

Page: 264

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In the aftermath of World War II, the United States stood at a precipice. The forces of modernity unleashed by the war had led to astonishing advances in daily life, but technology and mass culture also threatened to erode the country's traditional moral character. As award-winning historian George M. Marsden explains in [Title TK], postwar Americans looked to the country's secular, liberal elites for guidance in this precarious time, but these intellectuals proved unable to articulate a coherent common cause by which America could chart its course. Their failure lost them the faith of their constituents, paving the way for a Christian revival that offered America a firm new moral vision—one rooted in the Protestant values of the founders. A groundbreaking reappraisal of the country's spiritual reawakening, [Title TK] shows how America found new purpose at the dawn of the Cold War.

The Twilight of Social Conservatism

American Culture Wars in the Obama Era

Author: John Dombrink

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814738125

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

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Despite many Americans’ triumphant proclamations that Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 elections signified a post-partisan, post-racial society, it seems that the United States is more divided than ever. From the rise of the Tea Party, to strident anti-immigration and anti-welfare movements, to the so-called “war on women”, the United States on its surface appears to be caught in the turmoil of a culture war that has not relented since the Reagan era. But, as John Dombrink writes in The Twilight of Social Conservatism, the conservative backlash seen during Obama’s presidency is indicative not of a rising social conservative force in society, but of a waning one. Drawing on demographic research, political polls, contemporary media, and internet commentary, Dombrink demonstrates that the vitality of major social conservative ideas from the culture war era has faded. Support for once-divisive wedge issues, like same-sex marriage and reproductive rights, has increased dramatically, and Americans, particularly young Americans, are less religious and more libertarian than ever before. As he traces the end of the culture wars and the “unwedging” of American politics over the last eight years, Dombrink is quick to caution that social conservatism has not disappeared entirely from view. Nevertheless, the once-prominent “Moral Majority” pushing for dominance in American culture is now reconsidering itself as a minority, and Dombrink argues that it is unlikely that social conservative forces will ever regain the power and potency they once held in American politics. A comprehensive and insightful work, The Twilight of Social Conservatism deftly analyzes the liberalizing trends that created the social and political culture America has today and that portend to the culture America will have in years to come.

Dark Ages America: The Final Phase of Empire

Author: Morris Berman

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393078310

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 1857

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In Dark Ages America, the pundit Morris Berman argues that the nation has entered a dangerous phase in its historical development from which there is no return. As the corporate-consumerist juggernaut that now defines the nation rolls on, the very factors that once propelled America to greatness—extreme individualism, territorial and economic expansion, and the pursuit of material wealth—are, paradoxically, the nails in our collective coffin. Within a few decades, Berman argues, the United States will be marginalized on the world stage, its hegemony replaced by China or the European Union. With the United States just one terrorist attack away from a police state, Berman's book is a controversial and illuminating look at our current society and its ills.


The Twilight of the Intellectuals

Culture and Politics in the Era of the Cold War

Author: Hilton Kramer

Publisher: Ivan R Dee

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 363

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"In The Twilight of the Intellectuals, Mr. Kramer explores, in effect, the intellectual history of the cold war and its divisive impact on our politics and culture. His book is also necessarily about the consequences of the 1930s and the 1960s, two decades when the political left achieved its greatest influence." "The Twilight of the Intellectuals is part memoir, part reflection, part critical analysis. It is filled with incisive portraits of people and their ideas, and with the often peculiar details of the urgent intellectual debates that tore apart friendships, sundered movements and institutions, and made the life of the mind so important in a way we can scarcely appreciate today."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Twilight of Common Dreams

Why America Is Wracked by Culture Wars

Author: Todd Gitlin

Publisher: Holt Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780805040913

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

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A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 1995

The Twilight of Equality?

Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy

Author: Lisa Duggan

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 080709580X

Category: Social Science

Page: 136

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By now, we've all heard about the shocking redistribution of wealth that's occurred during the last thirty years, and particularly during the last decade. But economic changes like this don't occur in a vacuum; they're always linked to politics. The Twilight of Equality?searches out these links through an analysis of the politics of the 1990s, the decade when neoliberalism-free market economics-became gospel. After a brilliant historical examination of how racial and gender inequities were woven into the very theoretical underpinnings of the neoliberal model of the state, Duggan shows how these inequities play out today. In a series of political case studies, Duggan reveals how neoliberal goals have been pursued, demonstrating that progressive arguments that separate identity politics and economic policy, cultural politics and affairs of state, can only fail. Ultimately,The Twilight of Equality? not only reveals how the highly successful rhetorical maneuvers of neoliberalism have functioned but, more importantly, it shows a way to revitalize and unify progressive politics in the U.S. today.

The Twilight Of Atheism

The Rise and Fall of Disbelief in the Modern World

Author: Alister McGrath

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1407073761

Category: Education

Page: 320

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Atheism is one of the most important movements in modern Western culture. For the last two hundred years, it seemed to be on the verge of eliminating religion as an outmoded and dangerous superstition. Recent years, however, have witnessed the decline of disbelief and a rise in religious/spiritual devotion throughout the world. In this highly readable book, the distinguished historian and theologian, Alister McGrath examines what went wrong with the atheist dream and explains why religion and faith are destined to play a central role in the twenty-first century. A former atheist who is now one of Christianity's foremost scholars, McGrath traces the history of atheism from its emergence in eighteenth-century Europe as a revolutionary worldview that offered liberation from the rigidity of traditional Christianity and the oppression of tyrannical monarchs, to its golden age in the first half of the twentieth century. Blending thoughtful, authoritative historical analysis with incisive portraits of such leading and influential atheists as Sigmund Freud, Marx and Richard Dawkins, McGrath exposes the flaws at the heart of atheism and argues that the renewal of faith is a natural, inevitable and necessary response to its failures.

A Question of Values

Author: Morris Berman

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781453722886

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

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A Question of Values is Morris Berman's seventh book of cultural history and social criticism, and his first book of essays, which were written during 2007-10. Timely and uncompromising, they range across four principal topics: American culture and politics; the human existential condition; a close look at the nature of "progress"; and some thoughts on where Western civilization, in general, is headed. These articles pull no punches regarding our current situation, and represent some of Berman's finest writing to date. He challenges his readers to rethink the accepted mainstream system of values, and argues that in the end, our problems are as ethical in nature as they are political. In the context of a value system that is rapidly turning against us, Berman's message is simple: change or die.

Not Hollywood

Independent Film at the Twilight of the American Dream

Author: Sherry B. Ortner

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822399687

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

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The pioneering anthropologist Sherry B. Ortner combines her trademark ethnographic expertise with critical film interpretation to explore the independent film scene in New York and Los Angeles since the late 1980s. Not Hollywood is both a study of the lived experience of that scene and a critical examination of America as seen through the lenses of independent filmmakers. Based on interviews with scores of directors and producers, Ortner reveals the culture and practices of indie filmmaking, including the conviction of those involved that their films, unlike Hollywood movies, are "telling the truth" about American life. These films often illuminate the dark side of American society through narratives about the family, the economy, and politics in today's neoliberal era. Offering insightful interpretations of many of these films, Ortner argues that during the past three decades independent American cinema has functioned as a vital form of cultural critique.

About Time

Cosmology and Culture at the Twilight of the Big Bang

Author: Adam Frank

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439169616

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 7624

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The Big Bang is all but dead, and we do not yet know what will replace it. Our universe’s “beginning” is at an end. What does this have to do with us here on Earth? Our lives are about to be dramatically shaken again—as altered as they were with the invention of the clock, the steam engine, the railroad, the radio and the Internet. In The End of the Beginning, Adam Frank explains how the texture of our lives changes along with our understanding of the universe’s origin. Since we awoke to self-consciousness fifty thousand years ago, our lived experience of time—from hunting and gathering to the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution to the invention of Outlook calendars—has been transformed and rebuilt many times. But the latest theories in cosmology— time with no beginning, parallel universes, eternal inflation—are about to send us in a new direction. Time is both our grandest and most intimate conception of the universe. Many books tell the story, recounting the progress of scientific cosmology. Frank tells the story of humanity’s deepest question— when and how did everything begin?—alongside the story of how human beings have experienced time. He looks at the way our engagement with the world— our inventions, our habits and more—has allowed us to discover the nature of the universe and how those discoveries, in turn, inform our daily experience. This astounding book will change the way we think about time and how it affects our lives.

Irony in The Twilight Zone

How the Series Critiqued Postwar American Culture

Author: David Melbye

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442260327

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 254

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This book explores the multiple types of irony—technological, invasive, martial, sociopolitical, and domestic—that were employed by the classic television show The Twilight Zone. Each of these uses of irony acts as a critique of a specific aspect of American culture, but all inform each other, creating a larger sense of social critique.

Realist Poetics in American Culture, 1866-1900

Author: Elizabeth Renker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192536303

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

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The terms 'poetry' and 'realism' have a complex and often oppositional relationship in American literary histories of the postbellum period. The core narrative holds that 'realism', the major literary 'movement' of the era, developed apace in prose fiction, while poetry, stuck in a hopelessly idealist late-Romantic mode, languished and stagnated. Poetry is almost entirely absent from scholarship on American literary realism except as the emblem of realism's opposite: a desiccated genteel 'twilight of the poets.' Realist Poetics in American Culture, 1866-1900 refutes the familiar narrative of postbellum poetics as a scene of failure, and it recovers the active and variegated practices of a diverse array of realist poets across print culture. The triumph of the twilight tale in the twentieth century obscured, minimized, and flattened the many poetic discourses of the age, including but not limited to a significant body of realist poems currently missing from US literary histories. Excavating an extensive archive of realist poems, the volume offers a significant revision to the genre-exclusive story of realism and, by extension, to the very foundations of postbellum American literary history dating back to the earliest stages of the discipline.

White Lies

Race and Uncertainty in the Twilight of American Religion

Author: Christopher M. Driscoll

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317435265

Category: Religion

Page: 316

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White Lies considers African-American bodies as the site of cultural debates over a contested "white religion" in the United States. Rooting his analysis in the work of W.E.B. DuBois and James Baldwin, Christopher Driscoll traces the shifting definitions of "white religion" from the nineteenth century up to the death of Michael Brown and other racial controversies of the present day. He engages both modern philosophers and popular imagery to isolate the instabilities central to a "white religion," including the inadequacy of this framing concept as a way of describing and processing death. The book will be of interest to students and scholars interested in African-American Religion, philosophy and race, and Whiteness Studies.

The Twilight of the Middle Class

Post-World War II American Fiction and White-Collar Work

Author: Andrew Hoberek

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400826810

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

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In The Twilight of the Middle Class, Andrew Hoberek challenges the commonly held notion that post-World War II American fiction eschewed the economic for the psychological or the spiritual. Reading works by Ayn Rand, Ralph Ellison, Saul Bellow, Phillip Roth, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and others, he shows how both the form and content of postwar fiction responded to the transformation of the American middle class from small property owners to white-collar employees. In the process, he produces "compelling new accounts of identity politics and postmodernism that will be of interest to anyone who reads or teaches contemporary fiction. Hoberek argues that despite the financial gains and job security enjoyed by the postwar middle class, the transition to white-collar employment paved the way for its current precarious state in a country marked by increasingly deep class divisions. Postwar fiction provided the middle class with various imaginative substitutes for its former property-owning independence, substitutes that since then have not only allowed but abetted this class's downward mobility. To read this fiction in the light of the middle-class experience is thus not only to restore the severed connections between literary and economic "history in the second half of the twentieth "century, but to explore the roots of the contemporary crisis of the middle class.

Democracy Gone

A Chronicle of the Last Chapters of the Great American Democratic Experiment

Author: Robert P. Abele

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 0761846751

Category: Political Science

Page: 330

View: 8862

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This book argues that the last eight years in particular have shown us that our democracy has largely evaporated, leaving behind only an exoskeleton that was once its original vertebrae of ends and principles. It is critical to our form of democracy in the U.S. that citizens become active participants.

In the Twilight of Patriarchal Culture: The Struggle for Female Identity in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga

Author: Astrid Ernst

Publisher: Anchor Academic Publishing (aap_verlag)

ISBN: 3954895196

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 80

View: 1414

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The book investigates Meyer’s popular Twilight saga from a feminist point of view, focusing on the development of Bella’s character and her quest for identity in a rigidly patriarchal world. Bella’s life is entirely determined by the two central male characters who form a polarized axis which slowly tears her apart. Bella’s low self-esteem and her strong attachment to the over-idealized Edward Cullen are read as symptoms of her placelessness in a world that does not grant her space to develop as an autonomous subject. Bella’s wish to become a vampire can be equalled with a woman’s desire to gain access to a higher social realm via her husband and thereby escape her marginalisation in patriarchal culture. In order to live eternally in the idealized, capitalist, patriarchal and overly religious world that Edward represents, Bella has to make a series of sacrifices. Leaving her mother behind, she moves into a male dominated world which is divided into morally idealized vampires and racially devalued werewolves. She is forced to give up her friendship with Jacob Black, who represents her autonomous self, in order to find her patriarchal pre-defined destiny as mother and wife. Similar patterns of stereotypical representations of femininity can be found in various characters of the saga. A more controversial note is brought in by Bella’s half-vampire child who can be seen as a destabilizing factor of the saga’s rigid dichotomy. Taking all this into consideration, we have to ask whether it is desirable that millions of young women worldwide admire Bella and set her up as their role model.

The Twilight of Human Rights Law

Author: Eric Posner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199313466

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

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Countries solemnly intone their commitment to human rights, and they ratify endless international treaties and conventions designed to signal that commitment. At the same time, there has been no marked decrease in human rights violations, even as the language of human rights has become the dominant mode of international moral criticism. Well-known violators like Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Sudan have sat on the U.N. Council on Human Rights. But it's not just the usual suspects that flagrantly disregard the treaties. Brazil pursues extrajudicial killings. South Africa employs violence against protestors. India tolerate child labor and slavery. The United States tortures. In The Twilight of Human Rights Law--the newest addition to Oxford's highly acclaimed Inalienable Rights series edited by Geoffrey Stone--the eminent legal scholar Eric A. Posner argues that purposefully unenforceable human rights treaties are at the heart of the world's failure to address human rights violations. Because countries fundamentally disagree about what the public good requires and how governments should allocate limited resources in order to advance it, they have established a regime that gives them maximum flexibility--paradoxically characterized by a huge number of vague human rights that encompass nearly all human activity, along with weak enforcement machinery that churns out new rights but cannot enforce any of them. Posner looks to the foreign aid model instead, contending that we should judge compliance by comprehensive, concrete metrics like poverty reduction, instead of relying on ambiguous, weak, and easily manipulated checklists of specific rights. With a powerful thesis, a concise overview of the major developments in international human rights law, and discussions of recent international human rights-related controversies, The Twilight of Human Rights Law is an indispensable contribution to this important area of international law from a leading scholar in the field.