Women of Ancient Greece

Author: Don Nardo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781560066460

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 108

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Describes women in ancient Greece through the Hellenistic age, including their legal rights and status, their home life, their roles in community activities, and their image in mythology, drama, and philosophy.

Women of Ancient Greece

Author: Pierre Brulé

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 4363

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In this unique introduction to the representations of the Vietnam War in American history, literature and film, author Mark Taylor offers a concise, interdisciplinary approach to this most popular but complex of subjects. His aim is to show the intricate nature of crucial events in Vietnam, indicate the different ways in which historians and other writers and film makers have sought to make sense of them, and explore the sorts of truths which each claims to be telling - how can we know what is 'authentic'? Pierre Brule's brilliant evocation of how women lived in ancient Greece describes every aspect of their lives, including their religious, familial and domestic duties, their economic importance, and their social, moral and legal status as wives, cohabitees or slaves. He examines their sexual roles, what the status of a woman's body was and what her own and others' attitudes were likely to be towards it. Professor Brule does all this in the context of the development and achievements of Greek civilisation. Women appear not to have been highly regarded in ancient Greece, with female infanticide a common practice. Strains of misogyny can be heard in Greek literature, drama and philosophy: 'The most unintelligent people in the world' is how one character refers to women in Plato's Symposium (which also features Diotima, his best-known female sage). Women had few duties beyond the home, and the evidence that they existed at all is tantalisingly small. Yet by piecing together fragments and clues, the author gives us a vivid account of women's lives in Greece 2,500 years ago. Pierre Brule's deft scholarship and engaging style make this fascinating history always readable, sometimes moving, and often entertaining.

Women in Ancient Greece

Author: Sue Blundell

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674954731

Category: History

Page: 224

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Largely excluded from any public role, the women of ancient Greece nonetheless appear in various guises in the art and writing of the period, and in legal documents. These representations reveal a great deal about women's day-to-day experience as well as their legal and economic position - and how they were regarded by men.

Women Writers of Ancient Greece and Rome

An Anthology

Author: Ian Michael Plant

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806136219

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 268

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Despite a common perception that most writing in antiquity was produced by men, some important literature written by women during this period has survived. Edited by I. M. Plant, Women Writers of Ancient Greece and Rome is a comprehensive anthology of the surviving literary texts of women writers from the Graeco-Roman world that offers new English translations from the works of more than fifty women. From Sappho, who lived in the seventh century B.C., to Eudocia and Egeria of the fifth century A.D., the texts presented here come from a wide range of sources and span the fields of poetry and prose. Each author is introduced with a critical review of what we know about the writer, her work, and its significance, along with a discussion of the texts that follow. A general introduction looks into the problem of the authenticity of some texts attributed to women and places their literature into the wider literary and social contexts of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

Ancient Greek Women in Film

Author: Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199678928

Category: History

Page: 376

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This volume examines cinematic representations of ancient Greek women from the realms of myth and history. It discusses how these female figures are resurrected on the big screen by different filmmakers during different historical moments, and are therefore embedded within a narrative which serves various purposes, depending on the director of the film, its screenwriters, the studio, the country of its origin, and the sociopolitical context at the time of its production. Using a diverse array of hermeneutic approaches (such as gender theory, feminist criticism, psychoanalysis, viewer-response theory, and personal voice criticism), the essays aim to cast light on cinema's investments in the classical past and decode the mechanisms whereby the women under examination are extracted from their original context and are brought to life to serve as vehicles for the articulation of modern ideas, concerns, and cultural trends. The volume thus aims to investigate not only how antiquity on the screen depicts, and in this process distorts, compresses, contests, and revises, antiquity on the page but also, more crucially, why the medium follows such eclectic representational strategies vis-à-vis the classical world.

Sappho's Lyre

Archaic Lyric and Women Poets of Ancient Greece

Author: Diane J. Rayor

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520910966

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

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Sappho sang her poetry to the accompaniment of the lyre on the Greek island of Lesbos over 2500 years ago. Throughout the Greek world, her contemporaries composed lyric poetry full of passion, and in the centuries that followed the golden age of archaic lyric, new forms of poetry emerged. In this unique anthology, today's reader can enjoy the works of seventeen poets, including a selection of archaic lyric and the complete surviving works of the ancient Greek women poets—the latter appearing together in one volume for the first time. Sappho's Lyre is a combination of diligent research and poetic artistry. The translations are based on the most recent discoveries of papyri (including "new" Archilochos and Stesichoros) and the latest editions and scholarship. The introduction and notes provide historical and literary contexts that make this ancient poetry more accessible to modern readers. Although this book is primarily aimed at the reader who does not know Greek, it would be a splendid supplement to a Greek language course. It will also have wide appeal for readers of' ancient literature, women's studies, mythology, and lovers of poetry.

Rituals of Death and Dying in Modern and Ancient Greece

Writing History from a Female Perspective

Author: Evy Johanne Håland

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443868590

Category: History

Page: 690

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*Winner of the AFS Elli Köngäs-Maranda Prize 2016* Multidisciplinary or post-disciplinary research is what is needed when dealing with such complex subjects as ritual behaviour. This research, therefore, combines ethnography with historical sources to examine the relationship between modern Greek death rituals and ancient written and visual sources on the subject of death and gender. The central theme of this work is women’s role in connection with the cult of the dead in ancient and modern Greece. The research is based on studies in ancient history combined with the author’s fieldwork and anthropological analysis of today’s Mediterranean societies. Since death rituals have a focal and lasting importance, and reflect the gender relations within a society, the institutions surrounding death may function as a critical vantage point from which to view society. The comparison is based on certain religious festivals that are dedicated to deceased persons and on other death rituals. Using laments, burials and the ensuing memorial rituals, the relationship between the cult dedicated to deceased mediators in both ancient and modern society is analysed. The research shows how the official ideological rituals are influenced by the domestic rituals people perform for their own dead, and vice versa, that the modern domestic rituals simultaneously reflect the public performances. As this cult has many parallels with the ancient official cult, the following questions are central: Can an analysis of modern public and domestic rituals in combination with ancient sources tell the reader more about the ancient death cult as a whole? What does such an analysis suggest about the relationship between the domestic death cult and the official? Since the practical performance of the domestic rituals was – and still remains – in the hands of women, it is crucial to discover the extent of their influence to elucidate the real power relations between women and men. This research represents a new contribution to earlier presentations of the Greek “reality”, but mainly from the female perspective, which is highly significant since men produced most of the ancient sources. This means that the principal objective for this endeavour is to question the ways in which history has been written through the ages, to supplement the male with a female perspective, perhaps complementing an Olympian Zeus with a Chthonic Mother Earth. The research brings both ancient and modern worlds into mutual illumination; its relevance therefore transcends the Greek context both in time and space.

Women Poets in Ancient Greece and Rome

Author: Ellen Greene

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806136646

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 234

View: 5152

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Although Greek society was largely male-dominated, it gave rise to a strong tradition of female authorship. Women poets of ancient Greece and Rome have long fascinated readers, even though much of their poetry survives only in fragmentary form. This pathbreaking volume is the first collection of essays to examine virtually all surviving poetry by Greek and Roman women. It elevates the status of the poems by demonstrating their depth and artistry. Edited and with an introduction by Ellen Greene, the volume covers a broad time span, beginning with Sappho (ca. 630 b.c.e.) in archaic Greece and extending to Sulpicia (first century B.C.E.) in Augustan Rome. In their analyses, the contributors situate the female poets in an established male tradition, but they also reveal their distinctly “feminine” perspectives. Despite relying on literary convention, the female poets often defy cultural norms, speaking in their own voices and transcending their positions as objects of derision in male-authored texts. In their innovative reworkings of established forms, women poets of ancient Greece and Rome are not mere imitators but creators of a distinct and original body of work.

Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion

Author: Matthew Dillon

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415319164

Category: History

Page: 436

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Throughout history women have always played an important role in religious activities although individual cultures have dictated the nature and significance of this role. Classical Greek religion is no exception and both the iconography and literary evidence suggests a prominent position for women and girls in ritual and cultic activity. Drawing on both sources of evidence, as well as inscriptions, Matthew Dillon presents an insightful study of the subject exploring the private religious duties that women performed, how public piety was displayed, how women became priests, female religious patrons, women-only festivals and so on. Dillon examines evidence for the role of girls in religious ritual with their untainted hands making them ideal carriers of jugs, bowls and incense-bearers as well as carrying out other temple duties. The worship of non-mainstream deities, the role of marginal women such as slave women, foreigners and prostitutes, are also examined.

Women in the Classical World

Image and Text

Author: Elaine Fantham,Helene Peet Foley,Natalie Boymel Kampen,Sarah B. Pomeroy,H. A. Shapiro

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199762163

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 1378

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Information about women is scattered throughout the fragmented mosaic of ancient history: the vivid poetry of Sappho survived antiquity on remnants of damaged papyrus; the inscription on a beautiful fourth century B.C.E. grave praises the virtues of Mnesarete, an Athenian woman who died young; a great number of Roman wives were found guilty of poisoning their husbands, but was it accidental food poisoning, or disease, or something more sinister. Apart from the legends of Cleopatra, Dido and Lucretia, and images of graceful maidens dancing on urns, the evidence about the lives of women of the classical world--visual, archaeological, and written--has remained uncollected and uninterpreted. Now, the lavishly illustrated and meticulously researched Women in the Classical World lifts the curtain on the women of ancient Greece and Rome, exploring the lives of slaves and prostitutes, Athenian housewives, and Rome's imperial family. The first book on classical women to give equal weight to written texts and artistic representations, it brings together a great wealth of materials--poetry, vase painting, legislation, medical treatises, architecture, religious and funerary art, women's ornaments, historical epics, political speeches, even ancient coins--to present women in the historical and cultural context of their time. Written by leading experts in the fields of ancient history and art history, women's studies, and Greek and Roman literature, the book's chronological arrangement allows the changing roles of women to unfold over a thousand-year period, beginning in the eighth century B.C.E. Both the art and the literature highlight women's creativity, sexuality and coming of age, marriage and childrearing, religious and public roles, and other themes. Fascinating chapters report on the wild behavior of Spartan and Etruscan women and the mythical Amazons; the changing views of the female body presented in male-authored gynecological treatises; the "new woman" represented by the love poetry of the late Republic and Augustan Age; and the traces of upper- and lower-class life in Pompeii, miraculously preserved by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 C.E. Provocative and surprising, Women in the Classical World is a masterly foray into the past, and a definitive statement on the lives of women in ancient Greece and Rome.

Women in Ancient Greece

A Sourcebook

Author: Bonnie MacLachlan

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441179631

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 9783

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A rich collection of source material on women in the ancient Greek world including literary, rhetorical, philosophical and legal sources, and papyri and inscriptions.

Women in Ancient Greece

Author: Paul Chrystal

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 8095

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Examines women whose influence was positive, as well as those whose reputations were more notoriousSupremely well researched from many different historical sourcesSuperbly illustrated with photographs and drawings Women in Ancient Greece is a much-needed analysis of how women behaved in Greek society, how they were regarded, and the restrictions imposed on their actions. Given that ancient Greece was very much a man’s world, most books on ancient Greek society tend to focus on men; this book redresses the imbalance by shining the spotlight on that neglected other half. Women had significant roles to play in Greek society and culture – this book illuminates those roles. Women in Ancient Greece asks the controversial question: how far is the assumption that women were secluded and excluded just an illusion? It answers it by exploring the treatment of women in Greek myth and epic; their treatment by playwrights, poets and philosophers; and the actions of liberated women in Minoan Crete, Sparta and the Hellenistic era when some elite women were politically prominent. It covers women in Athens, Sparta and in other city states; describes women writers, philosophers, artists and scientists; it explores love, marriage and adultery, the virtuous and the meretricious; and the roles women played in death and religion. Crucially, the book is people-based, drawing much of its evidence and many of its conclusions from lives lived by historical Greek women.

Citizen Bacchae

Women’s Ritual Practice in Ancient Greece

Author: Barbara Goff

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520930582

Category: Religion

Page: 413

View: 7511

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What activities did the women of ancient Greece perform in the sphere of ritual, and what were the meanings of such activities for them and their culture? By offering answers to these questions, this study aims to recover and reconstruct an important dimension of the lived experience of ancient Greek women. A comprehensive and sophisticated investigation of the ritual roles of women in ancient Greece, it draws on a wide range of evidence from across the Greek world, including literary and historical texts, inscriptions, and vase-paintings, to assemble a portrait of women as religious and cultural agents, despite the ideals of seclusion within the home and exclusion from public arenas that we know restricted their lives. As she builds a picture of the extent and diversity of women’s ritual activity, Barbara Goff shows that they were entrusted with some of the most important processes by which the community guaranteed its welfare. She examines the ways in which women’s ritual activity addressed issues of sexuality and civic participation, showing that ritual could offer women genuinely alternative roles and identities even while it worked to produce wives and mothers who functioned well in this male-dominated society. Moving to more speculative analysis, she discusses the possibility of a women’s subculture focused on ritual and investigates the significance of ritual in women’s poetry and vase-paintings that depict women. She also includes a substantial exploration of the representation of women as ritual agents in fifth-century Athenian drama.

Women, Crime and Punishment in Ancient Law and Society

Volume 2: Ancient Greece

Author: Elisabeth Meier Tetlow

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780826416292

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 828

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The ancient period of Greek history, to which this volume is devoted, began in late Bronze Age in the second millennium and lasted almost to the end of the first century BCE, when the last remnant of the Hellenistic empire created by Alexander the Great was conquered by the Romans. Extant texts of law of actual laws are few and often found embedded in other sources, such as the works of orators and historians. Greek literature, from the epics of Homer to the classical dramas, provides a valuable source of information. However, since literary sources are fictional portrayals and often reflect the times and biases of the authors, other more concrete evidence from archaeology has been used throughout the volume to confirm and contextualize the literary evidence about women, crime, and punishment in ancient Greece. The volume is divided into three parts: (I) Mykenean and Archaic Greece, (II) Classical Greece, and (III the Hellenistic Period. The book includes illustrations, maps, lists of Hellenistic dynasties, and Indices of Persons, Place and Subjects. Crime and punishment, criminal law and its administration, are areas of ancient history that have been explored less than many other aspects of ancient civilizations. Throughout history women have been affected by crime both as victims and as offenders. In the ancient world, customary laws were created by men, formal laws were written by men, and both were interpreted and enforced by men. This two-volume work explores the role of gender in the formation and administration of ancient law and examines the many gender categories and relationships established in ancient law, including legal personhood, access to courts, citizenship, political office, religious office, professions, marriage, inheritance, and property ownership. Thus it focuses on women and crime within the context of women in the society.

Female Mobility and Gendered Space in Ancient Greek Myth

Author: Ariadne Konstantinou

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1474256775

Category: History

Page: 208

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Women's mobility is central to understanding cultural constructions of gender. Regarding ancient cultures, including ancient Greece, a re-evaluation of women's mobility within the household and beyond it is currently taking place. This invites an informed analysis of female mobility in Greek myth, under the premise that myth may open a venue to social ideology and the imaginary. Female Mobility and Gendered Space in Ancient Greek Myth offers the first comprehensive analysis of this topic. It presents close readings of ancient texts, engaging with feminist thought and the 'mobility turn'. A variety of Olympian goddesses and mortal heroines are explored, and the analysis of their myths follows specific chronological considerations. Female mobility is presented in quite diverse ways in myth, reflecting cultural flexibility in imagining mobile goddesses and heroines. At the same time, the out-of-doors spaces that mortal heroines inhabit seem to lack a public or civic quality, with the heroines being contained behind 'glass walls'. In this respect, myth seems to reproduce the cultural limitations of ancient Greek social ideology on mobility, inviting us to reflect not only on the limits of mythic imagination but also on the timelessness of Greek myth.

Choruses of Young Women in Ancient Greece

Their Morphology, Religious Role, and Social Functions

Author: Claude Calame,Derek Collins,Janice Orion

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742515253

Category: Drama

Page: 282

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In this groundbreaking work, Claude Calame argues that the songs sung by choruses of young girls in ancient Greek poetry are more than literary texts; rather, they functioned as initiatory rituals in Greek cult practices. Using semiotic and anthropologic theory, Calame reconstructs the religious and social institutions surrounding the songs, demonstrating their function in an aesthetic education that permitted the young girls to achieve the stature of womanhood and to be integrated into the adult civic community. This first English edition includes an updated bibliography.

Rites of Passage in Ancient Greece

Literature, Religion, Society

Author: Mark William Padilla

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 9780838754184

Category: History

Page: 312

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The twelve essays in this volume of Bucknell Review treat the topic of rites of passage in ancient Greece, focusing largely on Athenian tragedy, but also Plato, the Greek novel, the festival of Anthesteria, and other topics.

A Companion to Women in the Ancient World

Author: Sharon L. James,Sheila Dillon

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119025540

Category: History

Page: 650

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This publication presents an interdisciplinary, methodologically-based collection of essays on the study of women in the ancient world. It explores a broad range of topics relating to women in antiquity, including: mother-goddess theory; women in Homer, pre-Roman Italy, the Near East, women and the family, the state, and religion; Dress and adornment; female patronage; Hellenistic Queens; imperial women; women in late Antiquity; early women saints; and many more. PART I Women outside Athens and Rome 5; Case study I: The mother goddess in prehistory: debates and perspectives / Lauren Talalay; 1. Women in ancient Mesopotamia 11 / Amy R. Gansell; 2. Hidden voices: unveiling women in ancient Egypt / Kasia Szpakowska; 3. Looking for Minoan and Mycenaean women: paths of feminist scholarship towards the Aegean Bronze Age / Marianna Nikolaïdou; 4. Women in Homer / Cristiana Franco; 5. Etruscan women: towards a reappraisal / Vedia Izzet; PART II The archaic and classical periods; Case study II: Sex and the single girl: the Cologne fragment of Archilochus / Sharon L. James; 6. Woman, city, state: theories, ideologies, and concepts in the Archaic and classical Periods / Madeleine M. Henry and Sharon L. James; 7. Women and law / Barbara Levick; 8. Women and medicine / Holt Parker; 9. Reading the bones: interpreting the skeletal evidence for women's lives in ancient Greece / Maria A. Liston; 10. Approaches to reading attic vases / Kathryn Topper; 11. Spartan girls and the Athenian Gaze / Jenifer Neils; 12.Interpreting Women in Archaic and Classical Greek Sculpture / A. A. Donohue; 13. Dress and adornment in archaic and classical Greece / Mireille M. Lee; 14. Women and religion in Greece / Eva Stehle; 15. Women and Roman religion / Lora L. Holland; 16. Women in Magna Graecia / Gillian Shepherd; PART III Women in a cosmopolitan world: the Hellenistic and late republican periods / Case study III: Hellenistic Tanagra figurines / Sheila Dillon; Case Study IV: Domestic female slaves in Roman comedy / Sharon L. James; 17. Female patronage in the Greek Hellenistic and Roman republican periods / Anne Bielman; 18. Women on Hellenistic grave Stelai: reading images and texts / Christina A. Salowey; 19. Female portraiture in the Hellenistic period / Sheila Dillon; 20. Women and family in Menander / Cheryl A. Cox; 21. Gender and space, 'public' and 'Private' / Monika Trümper; 22. Oikos Keeping: women and monarchy in the Macedonian tradition / Elizabeth D. Carney; 23. The women of Ptolemaic Egypt: the view from Papyrology / Maryline Parca; 24. Jewish women: texts and contexts / Laura S. Lieber; 25. Women, education, and philosophy / Marguerite Deslauriers; 26. Perceptions of women's power in the late Republic: Terentia, Fulvia, and the generation of 63 BCE / T. Corey Brennan; PART IV The beginnings of empire; Case Study V: Vergil's Dido / Sharon L. James; 27. Women in Augustan Rome / Judith P. Hallett; 28. Women in Augustan literature / Alison Keith; 29. Women on the Bay of Naples / Eve D'Ambra; 30. Early imperial female portraiture / Elizabeth Bartman; 31. Portraits, prestige, piety: images of women in Roman Egypt / Christina Riggs; PART V From empire to christianity; Case study VI: Female portraiture in Palmyra / Maura K. Heyn; 32. Women in imperial Roman literature / Rhiannon Ash; 33. Female portraiture and female patronage in the high imperial period / Rachel Meyers; 34. Women in Roman Britain / Lindsay Allason-Jones; 35. Public roles for women in the cities of the Latin West / Emily A. Hemelrijk; 36. Rari exempli femina: female virtues on Roman funerary inscriptions / Werner Riess; 37. Women in Late Antique Egypt / Jennifer Sheridan Moss; 38. Representations of women in late Antiquity and early Byzantium / Ioli Kalavrezou; 39. Becoming christian / Ross S. Kraemer; Appendix: Women in Late Antiquity (Apart from Egypt): A bibliography.

Woman's Songs in Ancient Greece

Author: Anne L. Klinck

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773577211

Category: Poetry

Page: 312

View: 5865

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Through a balanced discussion of poetry as performance, relevant kinds and genres of poetry, the definition and scope of "woman's song" as a mode, partheneia (maidens' songs) and the girls' chorus, lyric in the drama, echoes and imitations of archaic woman's song in Hellenistic poetry, and inferences about the differences between male and female authors, Klinck demonstrates that woman's song is ultimately best understood as the product of a male-dominated culture but that feminine stereotypes, while refined by skilful male poets, are interrogated and shifted by female poets.